Spanish-American Institute

 

 

Course Syllabi

(English For Specific Purposes)

Summer 2017

revised: Winter 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Not-For-Profit, Equal Educational Opportunity English Language School

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 240 West 35th Street, Second Floor, NYC, NY 10001 ■ 212.840.7111 ■ info@sai.nyc ■ www.sai.nyc


Mission Statement

The Spanish-American Institute's mission is to provide effective English language skills training to individuals.

Philosophy

The Institute believes that students are more likely to begin and to successfully complete English language training when English For Specific Purposes courses (i.e. courses in other areas that are premised on language learning while having other content) are combined with ESL-Only courses.

Objectives

The Institute implements this philosophy through:

  • the establishment and maintenance of an effective faculty,
  • the development of English For Specific Purposes business and computer courses as well as traditional ESL only courses, and
  • the integration of a varied English as a Second Language course sequence.

The “Plus” Courses of the ESL-Plus Course of Study

The "Plus" courses of the ESL-Plus Course of Study have been reviewed within the context of English for Special Purposes (ESP) methodology and pedagogy.

The curriculum components for the ESP courses have goals, objectives, and student learning outcomes that are premised on language learning while having other content.

 


Table of Contents

Mission Statement  - 2 -

Table of Contents  - 3 -

200  English for Keyboarding for Information Processing   48 Classes  - 4 -

201  English for Keyboarding  (Basic Course)     120 Classes  - 6 -

202  English for Keyboarding  (Advanced Course)      120 Classes  - 8 -

203  English for Keyboarding  (Expert Course)       80 Classes  - 10 -

205  English for Machine Transcription         30 Classes  - 12 -

235 English for Introduction to MS Word (80 Classes) - 14 -

300  English for Business Management         120 Classes  - 17 -

302 English for Accounting (First Course)         120 Classes  - 21 -

303  English for Accounting (Intermediate Course)      120 Classes  - 25 -

304  English for Accounting (Advanced I)           60 Classes  - 28 -

305  English for Accounting (Advanced II)          60 Classes  - 31 -

604  English for TASC Preparation (formerly GED High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation) 240 Classes  - 34 -

605 English For Pre-GED Foundation for GED Preparation       80 hours  - 38 -

610  English for TOEFL Exam Preparation         80 hours  - 40 -

940  English for Introduction to Microsoft Windows         80 Classes  - 43 -

950  English for Using Excel          80 Classes  - 45 -

955  English for Using the Internet          80 Classes  - 48 -

965 English for Using Microsoft PowerPoint          80 classes  - 51 -

975  English for Using Adobe Photoshop                            160 classes  - 54 -

990  English for Introduction to Mac      80 classes  - 57 -

995  English For Switching to Mac                 80 classes  - 60 -

1000  English for Using Apple iMovie                           80 classes  - 63 -


200  English for Keyboarding for Information Processing   48 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

None - Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package.

Course Description:  

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students develop English language skills related to keyboarding and information processing.  Students acquire language related to keyboarding while exploring basic keyboarding and information processing.  Students also utilize language skills to complete basic computer application tasks.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:

  • keyboarding vocabulary
  • identification of keyboarding spelling and punctuation errors

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • demonstrate understanding English keyboarding terms;
  • identify and  modify English spelling, punctuation, and other language errors in a document
  • type a short, timed document using grammatically correct English

Student Learning Outcomes:

To identify and utilize keyboarding terms with 80% accuracy.

  • to read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;
  • to recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors; and
  • to compose short, timed writings with 80% accuracy.

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package which are premised on English language learning while having keyboarding content.  Each student creates a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%.

Course Outline:

The English for Keyboarding for Information Processing topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based integrated approach to language learning.

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Software introduction.  Orally and visually identifying and key stroking alphabetical characters. 

Diagnostic and progress tests. 

3

Orally and visually identifying and keyboarding punctuation and numbers.  Learning left and right shift.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

4

Orally and visually identifying and keyboarding symbols. Random word practice.   Accuracy typing game.                  

Progress tests

5

Random sentence practice with and without numbers.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

6

Reading, interpreting, and building speed and accuracy building keyboarding text.  Keyboarding difficult words.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

7

Alternating fingers; reaches and high-risk combinations.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

 

8

Reading, understanding, and keyboarding prefixes and suffixes, vowels and consonants, and numbers and symbols.  Accuracy typing game. 

Progress tests

9

Reading, interpreting, and building speed and accuracy keyboarding text.  Accuracy and speed typing games. 

Progress tests

10

Reading, interpreting, and building speed and accuracy keyboarding text.  Accuracy and speed typing games. 

Progress tests

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 1/10, 3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


201  English for Keyboarding  (Basic Course)     120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks: 

None - Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package.

Course Description:

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students develop English language skills related to keyboarding and information processing.  Students acquire language related to keyboarding while exploring keyboarding and information processing.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will reinforce students’:

  • ability to comprehend and use English vocabulary related to keyboarding
  • keyboarding techniques

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read, comprehend, and edit English language errors in letters and documents
  • transfer and type letters, reports, tables, memos and business documents from handwritten text
  • type 25 WPM with less than 5 errors in 5 minutes

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • to read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;
  • to recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors;
  • to recognize directions in English when practicing keyboarding exercises;
  • to distinguish concepts and implementation;
  • to identify and correct English language errors in producing documents; 
  • to produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from hand-written and from printed text in English with 80% accuracy;
  • to develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and
  • ▪to build basic speed and accuracy skills (to 25 wpm keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes).

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.    Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package which are premised on English language learning while having keyboarding content.   

Grading:  The final grade is based on the the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

The English for Keyboarding (Basic Course) topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

The program is computer adaptive.  Students move through lessons based on skill levels.  The lessons and skill level adjusts as they improve.  Computerized progress tests measure skill levels.  Progress tests during school bi-monthly exams used to measure course objectives. 

Week 8

  Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 15 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 16

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 20 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 24

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 20 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes

 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


202  English for Keyboarding  (Advanced Course)      120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Keyboarding 201 or equivalent.

Textbooks:  None - Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package. 

Course Description: 

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students further develop English language skills related to keyboarding and information processing.  Students acquire structural and functional language  related to keyboarding while business correspondence, reports, tabulations, forms from unarranged and rough-draft hand-written and print copy sources in English.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will:

  • reinforce students’ receptive ability to interpret  advanced keyboarding exercises
  • develop students’ interpretation and application of business language and situations

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • demonstrate correct vocabulary and grammar usage when producing a document with 80% accuracy
  • recognize keyboarding instructions
  • examine  information from multiple sources to determine proper document format.
  • interpret and type documents from printed English.
  • type 25 wpm with no more that 5 errors in 5 minutes

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • to comprehend and utilize English word division and composite words;
  • to interpret directions in English when practicing advanced keyboarding exercises;
  • to interpret and apply English language descriptions of business situations in the production of documents;
  • to synthesize information from various English language sources that will determine the format of document production;  
  • to produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from hand-written and from printed text in English, identifying and correcting language errors;
  • to develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and
  • to build basic speed and accuracy skills to 25 wpm while keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.    Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package which are premised on English language learning while having keyboarding content.   

Grading:  The final grade is based on the the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

The English for Keyboarding (Advanced Course) topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

The program is computer adaptive.  Students move through lessons based on skill levels.  The lessons and skill level adjusts as they improve.  Computerized progress tests measure skill levels.  Progress tests during school bi-monthly exams used to measure course objectives. 

Week 8

  Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 15 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 16

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 20 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 24

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 25 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes

 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/2013, 6/2017


203  English for Keyboarding  (Expert Course)       80 Classes

Prerequisite(s):  Keyboarding 202 or equivalent.

Textbooks:  None - Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package. 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students further develop English language skills related to keyboarding; focusing on speed and accuracy skills through production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft hand-written and print copy sources in English

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will reinforce students’:

  • ability to apply English reading, speaking and writing skills to determine format and produce business documents
  • keyboarding skills, including touch control, techniques, and speed

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • demonstrate comprehension of keyboarding directions and apply to various business situations
  • differentiate between various business  situations and modify document formats, including letters, reports, memos and  tables.
  • locate English grammatical, spelling and composition errors
  • type 45 wpm with less than 5 errors in 5 minutes

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • to comprehend and apply directions in English when practicing advanced keyboarding exercises within  integrated business situations experiences requiring English language reading, discussion, and writing skills;
  • to distinguish English language descriptions of complex business situations that will determine the production of documents;
  • to synthesize information from various English language sources that will determine the format of document production;   
  • to produce within situated experiences various kinds of letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from English language text, identifying and correcting language errors;
  • to develop advanced touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and
  • to build basic speed and accuracy skills (to 45 wpm, keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes).

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing or comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package which are premised on English language learning while having keyboarding content.   

Grading:  The final grade is based on the the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

The English for Keyboarding (Expert Course) topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics 

Assignments and Tests

The program is computer adaptive.  Students move through lessons based on skill levels.  The lessons and skill level adjusts as they improve.  Computerized progress tests measure skill levels.  Progress tests during school bi-monthly exams used to measure course objectives. 

Week 8

  Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 35 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

Week 16

Progress tests.  Standard set at typing at least 45 wpm with a maximum of 5 errors in 5 minutes. 

 

rev.2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


205  English for Machine Transcription         30 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbook:  None - Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing dictation and transcription lessons or a comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package.

Course Description:

In this “English Through Machine Transcription” course students develop English language skills through listening and transcribing English phrases and sentences that simulate workplace tasks and materials

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:

  • ability to transcribe English dictation
  • ability to comprehend spoken and written English
  • ability to identify and correct language errors in written and spoken English

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • use homonyms
  • ask concise  questions pertaining to concepts or implementation
  • differentiate between types of documents depending on the business situation
  • recognize and correct language errors made by the transcriber and the dictator
  • transcribe 15 lines of English in letter copy in 10 minutes

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • comprehend English word division and composite words;
  • utilize homonyms in the context of dictation;
  • identify and distinguish between English words not spelled phonetically that typically cause difficulty;
  • comprehend spoken and written directions in English when transcribing from English dictation;
  • utilize functional knowledge of English to ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;
  • identify English language descriptions of business situations that will determine the correct production of documents;
  • produce letters from English language dictation and to identify and correct language errors made by the transcriber and the person dictating;
  • transcribe 15 lines of English language letter copy in 10

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing dictation and transcription lessons or a comparable interactive computer-assisted instructional software package which are premised on English language learning while having machine transcription content.  Classes include development and theory sessions followed by hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy. 

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

The English for Machine Transcription topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Transcription principles and practice from printed text

Transcription Exercises 1-5

2

Transcription from print (cont.)

Transcription Exercises 6-11

3

Dictation principles and practice

Dictation Lessons 1-3

4

Dictation practice

Dictation Lessons 4-6

5

Dictation practice

Dictation Lessons 7-8

6

Dictation practice

Dictation Lessons 9-10

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


235 English for Introduction to MS Word (80 Classes)

PREREQUISITE:

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Microsoft Office 2008 for the Macintosh:  Visual QuickStart Guide by Steve Schwartz.  Peachpit Press, 2008.  ISBN 0-321-53400-X. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through MS Word” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully understand and execute concepts, features, functions, and applications in MS Word.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ skills using MS Word functions and features in English.

OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

·         Interpret textbook readings and directions in English

·         Use clear concise English to ask questions

·         Explain MS Word procedures using clear concise English

·         Discuss the basics of MS Word operating system

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read about MS Word and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • Follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • Ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;
  • Explain to others procedures used or results obtained;
  • Understand the basics of the MS Word operating system
  • Produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal and business documents from copy;
  • Proofread documents and make necessary corrections;
  • Apply basic word processing using MS Word, including entering, formatting, creating tables, using styles and templates, mail merging, and using graphics

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills for speed and accuracy using WORD which are premised on English language learning while having Microsoft Word content.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%. 

Course Outline:

The English for Introduction to MS Word topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution. 

Introduction to Word:  starting the program, using the mouse and keyboard, understanding screen elements, and understanding application features.

Exercises 1-5

 

 

2

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situation requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Creating, saving, and printing documents. 

Reading, discussing, and responding with an original document to activity. 

Exercises 6-15

3

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Opening and editing documents:  opening documents and editing them; inserting text; proofreading; copying and pasting; sending Word documents as e-mail.

Exercises 16-23

4

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Formatting text:  setting tabs and alignment; changing fonts; highlighting text; and using symbols, bullets, and enumeration. 

Exercises 24-30

5

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Formatting documents:  using alignment, line and paragraph spacing, and hyperlinks; setting margins; and creating and formatting a one-

page report.

Exercises 31-35

6

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Managing documents:  previewing files and working with document properties; locating and printing a file or multiple files; finding files; and saving files as web pages. 

Exercises 36-42

7

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Using Tables to organize information:  creating tables and entering data; merging and splitting cells; moving and resizing tables; using tables in HTML. 

Exercises 43-51

8

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Using Merge:  using Merge to create form letters, envelopes, and letters; doing mass mailings using Merge.

Review for exam.

Exercises 52-56

Exam. 

9

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Producing multiple-page documents:  working with multi-page documents; using headers and footers and footnotes and endnotes; using outlines; inserting breaks; dragging and dropping text; creating bookmarks; and tracking changes.  

Exercises 57-66

10

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Using Word's desktop publishing and automation features:  using columns, borders and shading, and text boxes; and using templates, wizards, and macros. 

Exercises 67-73

11

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Using Word's graphics capabilities:  enhancing Word documents with graphics objects, clip art, and AutoShapes; layering objects with text: and using an Internet simulation to download clip art from the Internet.

Exercises 74-83

12

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Integrating Word with other applications:  copying information between programs, embedding and editing embedded objects; and embedding and merging with other Microsoft applications.

Exercises 84-90

13

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution. 

Skill refinement combining application integration, and Internet skills:  using templates; retrieving Internet data; sending Web document via e-mail, downloading clip art, and other skills integration; recording a Macro for Mail Merge; etc.

Exercises 91-97

14

Reading and discussing the unit's "On the Job" situations requiring a word processing activity or solution.

Advanced skills:  creating tables of content, indexes, charts, and forms; creating multiple versions of the same document; customizing toolbars; etc.   

Exercises 98-104

15

Final project 

Project developed following instructor guidelines

16

Final project

Continue work on final project.

Exam.   

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/2013, 6/2017


300  English for Business Management         120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

W.L. Megginson et al, Small Business Management:  An Entrepreneur's Guidebook, 4th edition, Irwin McGraw-Hill, 2002 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Business Management” course students develop English language skills and acquire business terminology and common structures used in business settings. Through reading, discussion, and case study analysis, students develop an understanding of  English language usage:

·         in small business planning,

·         marketing and operational strategy development,

·         legal and financial issues, and

·         day-to-day supervision and control procedures.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:

  • knowledge of  English business management key terms
  • ability to assess visual material

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • describe key small business management terms in English
  • use English to examine and interpret various visual materials including, graphs and charts
  • analyze, discuss and write about small business problems in English
  • create a small business plan in English

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • identify key English terms related to small business management;
  • analyze and interpret, in English, graphs, charts, and other visual material;
  • read, discuss, and write in English about cases illustrating typical small business situations or problems; and
  • develop an individual small business plan in English. 

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.   Students will read, discuss, and write in response to situations described in the text; in reponse to quotations, charts, tables, and pictures; and in response to "cases" which are premised on English language learning while having bisiness management content.   

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Business Management topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

a.) Using the text:  parts of the book and learning aids.

b.) Introduction to small business issues and trends.

 

Read chapter 1.

Select one chapter chart and one "question for discussion" write at least a paragraph explaining each.

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

3

Opportunities and challenges in small business:  reasons people start small business, characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, opportunities for small businesses, and concerns of small business owners. 

Read chapter 2.. 

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph for each.

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

4

Forms of ownership:  proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and others; selecting and evaluating the right legal form.

Individual oral presentation within small group in response to a specific chapter case. 

Read chapter 3. 

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Select and write at least a paragraph in response. 

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

5

Becoming a small business owner:  identifying a needed product and a market for it; franchising. 

Read chapter 4.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

6-7

Planning in organizing and managing a small business:  strategic, operational, and financial planning; components of a business plan; writing, presenting, and implementing the plan; writing a resume. 

Brief individual oral presentations explaining a chapter visual or figure. 

Read chapter 5.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each. 

Select one component of the sample business plan and explain why it is important.

Using the models in the sample business plan, write a resume for yourself. 

Open book test on material covered so far.  

8

Financing your business:  various forms and sources of financing; presenting yourself to lenders. 

Review for exam. 

Read chapter 6.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

 

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

Exam. 

9

Marketing strategies:  marketing concepts; using research; packaging, pricing, and other aspects of marketing; implementing and evaluating a marketing strategy. 

Individual within small group oral presentations in response to a specific chapter case

Read chapter 7.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

10

Promoting and distributing a product:  choosing a distribution channel; advertising, merchandizing, and promoting the product; managing credit. 

Read chapter 8.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

11

Human resources:  recruiting, selecting, training, and developing employees; complying with Equal Employment Opportunity laws and regulations; compensating employees and providing benefits; protecting their health and safety. 

Individual within small group oral presentations in response to a specific chapter case

Read chapter 9.

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

12

Maintaining good employee relationships:  defining an organizational structure; exercising effective leadership; communicating with and motivating employees; evaluating employee's performance; imposing structure and discipline; terminating employees. 

Read chapter 10

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

 

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

13

Locating and laying out facilities:  developing operating systems; locating facilities; planning the physical facility; improving operations. 

 

Read chapter 11

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Prepare your part of a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the chapter cases.

14

Purchasing, inventory, and quality control:  selecting suppliers and establishing purchasing procedures; controlling inventory; assuring quality control. 

Individual within small group oral presentations in response to a specific chapter case

Read chapter 12

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Continue to work on small group presentation. 

15

Planning for profit:  business financial structure; profit-making activities; planning for profitability. 

Read chapter 13

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

16

Budgeting and taxes:  controlling operations and using budgetary control; evaluating financial conditions; local, state, and federal taxes; employment and personal owner taxes; record keeping for tax purposes.

Review for exam.  

Read chapter 14

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group to prepare a small group oral presentation that responds to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter

Exam. 

17

Information technology:  role of information in small business; creating appropriate management information systems; using information technology to promote your business.  

Read chapter 15

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

18

Risk management, insurance, and crime prevention:  types of risk, minimizing loss with insurance, and preventing crime; safeguarding employees. 

Read chapter 16

Select one chapter visual or figure and write at least a paragraph explaining it.

Select one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph in response. 

Work with a small group on a small group oral presentation about one of the cases at the end of the chapter

19-20

Business-government relations and business ethics:  basic laws affecting small business; government help for small business; government regulations and paperwork; social and ethically responsible behavior. 

Read chapter 17

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Write a response to the questions following one of the cases at the end of the chapter. 

21

Planning for the future:  preparing the next generation and preparing for management succession; tax and estate planning. 

Read chapter 18

Select one chapter visual or figure and one "question for discussion" and write at least a paragraph about each.  .

Work with a small group on a small group oral presentation about one of the cases at the end of the chapter

22-23

Individual Project:  Developing a successful business plan. 

Read "Workbook for Developing a Successful Business Plan"

Follow instructor guidelines for developing an individual business plan for written and oral presentation next week. 

24

Individual project oral reports. 

Review for exam. 

Individual oral and written reports summarizing business plan.

Final exam. 

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


302 English for Accounting (First Course)         120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume I:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text)

Course Description:

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with basic accounting functions. This course sequence introduces students to the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will introduce students to:

  • the purposes and principles of accounting
  • fundamental accounting procedures
  • accounting principles viewed from different business types

Objectives: 

Students will be able to:

·        read and explain accounting descriptions and business language.

·        clearly pronounce numbers and numerical functions

·        interpret and use visual materials including charts and graphs

·        speak, read, and write about various accounting situations

·        breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions

·        apply accounting principles to merchandising inventories and sales costs

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;
  • develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions;
  • interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;
  • speak and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;
  • read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;
  • interpret orally and in writing how businesses communicate with financial statements; and
  • apply accounting principles and procedures to analyzing and recording transactions, to accrual accounting and financial statement, to completing the accounting cycle, to accounting for merchandising activities and to merchandise inventories and sales costs.   

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include reading, discussion and practice with numbers, instructor and student explanations of basic accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts which are premised on English language learning while having accounting content.  .  

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Accounting (First Course) topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Mapping the text: the text and its help features

Accounting in the information age. 

Forms of organizations: business and non-business.

Using word problems. 

Chart interpretation:  Exhibits 1.1. and 1.2. 

Reading:  chapter learning objectives; chapter preview; pp. 1-9.

Questions: QS 1-1 to 1-3.  Answer questions

 following the guidelines provided by the instructor. 

2

Financial activities in organizations. 

Financial statements:  balance sheets, income statements, statement of changes in owner's equity, statement of cash flows

Using word problems.

Practice:  reading and discussing statements with numbers and functions (exhibits 1.8 to 1.11)

Reading:  assigned.

Questions: QS1-3 and 1-8. 

Exercises: 1-1 to 1-3, as assigned.

Problem Set: 1-1A.  

3

Ethics and social responsibility.

Career opportunities: accounting specializations and accounting-related opportunities

Using understand word problems. 

Practice: discussion involving numbers and functions (exhibit 1.17)

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading: assigned

Questions:  QS 1-9 and 1-10

Exercises: 1-9 to 1-11.

Problem Set: 1-1B to 1-3B

4

Financial statements:  communicating with financial statements; generally accepted accounting principles; introduction to the accounting equation

Using word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 36-46

Question:  QS 2-1 

Exercises:  2-1 to 2-2

Problem Set: 2-1A

5

Business transactions:  transactions and the accounting equation

Using  understand word problems. 

Practice: discussion involving numbers and functions

Chart interpretation. 

Reading:  pp. 46-51

Question:  QS2-4 

Exercises 2-3 to 2-5

Problem Set:  2-2A to 2-3A

6

Financial statements:  income statements, changes in owner's equity, balance sheets, cash flow statements

Using word problems.

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems.   

Interpretation of charts, graphs, and tables. 

Reading:  pp. 52-57

Questions: QS 2-5

Exercises:  2-6A to 2-9A

Problem Set: 2-4A to 2-6A

7

Analyzing transactions:  transactions and documents, accounts and double entry accounting

Using word problems. 

Practice: discussion about numbers and functions

Reading:  pp. 78-87

Questions:  QS3-1 to 3-2

Exercises:  3-1 to 3-2

8

Individual oral presentation of how to compute the balance for a T-Account. 

Review for exam.

 

Review exercises, as assigned.

Write a paragraph or more in which you explain how to compute the balance for the T-Account in exhibit 3.6. 

Bi-monthly exam

9

Processing transactions:  journalizing transactions, balance column accounts, and posting journal entries

Using word problems.

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems.  

Oral chart, graph, and table interpretation. 

Reading:  pp. 88-96

Questions:  QS3-4

Exercises:  3-2 to 3-8 (as assigned)

10

Trial balance:  preparing, using, correcting, and presenting trial balances

Using word problems.

Practice:  reading aloud and discussing statements with numbers and functions.  

Reading:  pp. 97-102

Questions:  QS3-5 to 3-6

Exercises:  3-9 to 3-12 (as assigned)

Problem Set: 3A (as assigned)

11

Accrual accounting:  timing and reporting, adjusting, recognizing revenues and expenses; accrual vs. cash flow basis

Using word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 124-129

Questions:  QS4-1 to 4-3

Exercises: 4-1 to 4-3

Problem Set: 4-1A

12

Adjusting accounts: adjusting for expenses, depreciation, unearned revenue, etc.

Using word problems.

Small group work:  providing the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems.   

Reading:  pp. 129-139

Questions: QS4-4 to 4-7

Exercises:  4-4 to 4-7

Problem Set: 4-2A

13

Preparing financial statements.  Using word problems

Oral chart, graph, and table interpretation.   

Reading:  pp. 140-144

Questions: QS4-8 to 4-12

Exercises:  4-8 to 4-9

Problem Set: 4-3A

14

Completing the accounting cycle:  the closing process for temporary and permanent accounts, recording closing entries, and post-closing trial balance

Using word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 168-174

Questions:  QS5-1 to 5-4

Exercises:  5-1 to 5-7

Problem Set:  5-1A to 5-3A

15

Using the work sheet as a tool:  stating cash flows and reviewing the accounting cycle

Using word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 174-181

Questions:  QS5-5 to 5-6

Exercises:  5-8 to 5-11

Problem Set:  5-4A

16

Review for exam

In writing, explain what someone looking at the statement of cash flows in exhibit 5.11 can tell about the financial situation of the company. 

Bi-monthly exam

17

Classified balance sheets:  classification structure and categories

Using word problems. 

Oral chart, graph, and table interpretation. 

T:  pp. 182-188

Questions:  QS5-7

Exercises:  5-12

Problem Set: 6-1 A

18

Accounting for merchandising:  merchandising activities and merchandise purchases, including discounts, returns, allowances, etc. 

Using word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 212-222

Questions:  QS6-1 to 6-2

Exercises:  6-1 to 6-5

Problem Set:  6-3 A

19

Merchandise sales and other merchandise issues:  sales transactions, discounts, returns, allowances, cost and price adjustments, cost flows, etc.

Using word problems.

Oral chart, table, and graph interpretation.    

Reading:  pp. 223-229

Questions:  QS6-4 to 6-8

Exercises:  6-7 to 6-14

Problem Set: as assigned

20

Income statement formats:  multiple-step and single-step income statements, merchandising cash flows

Using word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 230-237

Questions:  QS

Exercises:  assigned

Problem Set:  6-4 to 6-5A

21

Merchandise inventories:  assigning costs to inventory and inventory analysis and effects

Using word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 260-269

Questions:  QS7-1 to 7-6

Exercises:  7-1 to 7-3

Problem Set:  7-1A

22

Inventory items and costs

Using word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 270-272

Questions:  QS7-7 to 7-8

Exercises:  7-4 & 7-7 to 7-8

Problem Set:  7-2 A

23

Other inventory valuations

Using word problems. 

Reading:  pp. 273-283

Questions:  QS7-9 to 7-10

Exercises:  7-9 to 7-12

Problem Set:  7-3 to 7-7A to

24

Putting it all together:  comparative analysis of two companies, ethics challenge, and entrepreneurial decision making

Using word problems. 

Small group work:  defining how to provide the appropriate accounting solution for situations described in word problems. 

Review for exam. 

Comparative analysis A1, p. 298

Ethics challenge A 1, p. 298

Entrepreneurial decision BTN 7-8, p. 289

Bi-monthly exam

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/2013, 6/2017


303  English for Accounting (Intermediate Course)      120 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

Accounting 302 or equivalent

Textbooks:

Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume I:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with intermediate accounting functions.  This second course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures.  Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will reinforce students’ knowledge of

  • the purposes and principles of accounting
  • fundamental accounting procedures
  • accounting principles viewed from different business types

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • interpret written accounting and general business language
  • interpret and use visual materials including charts and graphs
  • speak, read, and write about various accounting situations
  • breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions
  • explain the concept and form of accounting information systems
  • apply accounting principles to cash and internal control; to receivables and short-term investments; to plant assets, natural resources, and intangibles; to current liabilities; and to partnerships. 

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;
  • interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;
  • talk and write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;
  • read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;
  • interpret how businesses communicate with financial statements
  • understand the concept and forms of accounting information systems; and
  • apply accounting principles and procedures to cash and internal control; to receivables and short-term investments; to plant assets, natural resources, and intangibles; to current liabilities; and to partnerships. 

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include reading, discussion and presentations, instructor and student explanations of accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts which are premised on English language learning while having accounting content.  .  

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Accounting (Intermediate Course) topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-4

Accounting information systems: 

Practice:  explaining what the cash receipts journal in exhibit 8.7 communicates.

Review of selected text. 

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Discussion of responses to ethics challenge. 

Reading:  pp. 300-324.

Questions: QS 8-1 to 8-6.  Answer questions.

Exercises:  8-1 to 8-14, as assigned.

Problem Set:  as assigned. 

Explain in writing one of the problems in 8-1 to 8-14 and the steps used to solve it. 

Ethics challenge, p. 348:  Write a paragraph or more in response

5-8

Cash and internal control:  internal control, control of cash, and banking activities as controls. 

Practice:  explaining what the bank statements in various chapter exhibits communicate.

Practice:  explaining Reebok's balance sheet analysis based on responses to question 10.

Practice: describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps used to solve it. 

Practice:  discussion of Ethics Challenge, p. 391.  

Review of selected text.  

Review for exam, week 8. 

Reading:  pp. 352-378.

Questions: QS 9-1 to 9-7.

Exercises:  as assigned

Problem Set: as assigned

Explain in writing one of the problems in 8-1 to 8-14 and the steps used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to question 10 on p. 381.  Be specific.

Bi-monthly exam, week 8. 

9-12

Receivables and short-term investments. 

Practice:  explaining the graph in exhibit 10.1 and the chart in "'Did You Know?" p. 412.

Practice:  responses to question 11, 12, or 13. 

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and its solution.  

Practice:  discussion of "Communicating in Practice" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 434-435. 

Review of selected text.  

Reading:  pp. 394-420.

Questions:  QS 10-1 to 10-8.

Exercises and Problem Set: as assigned.

Write a paragraph or more in response to question 11, 12, or 13, p. 423.  Be specific.

Explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to the "Entrepreneurial Decision" case on pp. 434-435

13-16

Plant assets, natural resources, and intangibles:  cost of plant assets, depreciation, revenue and capital expenditures, and disposals; etc.

Practice:  explaining exhibit 11.1 and 11.17 graphs and what exhibit accounting statements communicate. 

Practice:  responding to quick study questions 11-1 to 11-12.

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises with demonstrating  the steps used to solve it. 

Practice:  discussion of "Ethics Challenge" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems, pp. 477 and 478. 

Review of selected text.

Review for exam, week 16.  

Reading:  pp. 436-463.

Question:  QS 11-1 to 11-12. 

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 477 and 478

Bi-monthly exam, week 16.   

 

17-20

Current liabilities:  liabilities characteristics, known/determinable liabilities, estimated liabilities, contingent liabilities, and long-term liabilities.

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and the steps used to solve it. 

Practice:  discussion of "Ethics Challenge" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 523 and 524. 

Review of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 480-508.

Question:  QS 12-1 to 12-11.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned.

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 523 and 524

21-24

Partnerships:  forms of business organization and partnership form; basic partnership accounting, admission and withdrawal of partners, partnership liquidation. 

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps used to solve it. 

Practice:  discussion of "Ethics Challenge" and "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 523 and 525. 

Review of selected text.

Review for exam., week 24. 

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 526-543. 

Questions: QS 13-1 to 13-7

Exercises:  as assigned.

Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

Write a paragraph or more in response to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 523 and 525

Bi-monthly exam, week 24.

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


304  English for Accounting (Advanced I)           60 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

Accounting 303 or equivalent

Textbooks:

Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume II:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with advanced accounting functions. This third course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will expand students’ knowledge of:

  • purposes and principles of accounting
  • fundamental accounting procedures
  • analysis and application of various accounting concepts and procedures

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read and explain accounting descriptions and business language.
  • clearly pronounce numbers and numerical functions
  • interpret and use visual materials including charts and graphs
  • speak, read, and write about various accounting situations
  • breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions
  • apply accounting principles to equity transactions and corporate accounting, term liabilities, long-term investments, reporting and analyzing cash flows, analysis of financial statements, and managerial accounting and job order cost accounting concepts and principles.

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;
  • develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions;
  • interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;
  • talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;
  • read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;
  • interpret how business communicates with financial statements
  • apply accounting principles and procedures to equity transactions and corporate accounting, term liabilities, long-term investments, reporting and analyzing cash flows, analysis of financial statements, and managerial accounting and job order cost accounting concepts and principles.

 

 

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes will include reading, discussion and presentations, instructor and student explanations of accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts which are premised on English language learning while having accounting content.  

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Accounting (Advanced I) topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Equity transactions and corporate reporting:  corporate form of organization; common and preferred stock; dividends; treasury stock; reporting income information; retained earnings, 

Review of selected text. 

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps you used to solve it. 

Discussion of responses to ethics challenge.

Review of selected text.   

Reading:  pp. 556-590. 

Questions: QS 14-1 to 14-6.  Answer questions.

Exercises:  as assigned. Problem Set:  as assigned. 

 

3-4

Long-term liabilities:  bond basics, bond issuances, bond retirement, long-term notes payable.  

Practice:  describing how you would handle the ethics challenge on p. 611 or the entrepreneurial decision problem on p. 612. 

Review of selected text. 

Quiz.  

. 

Reading:  pp. 614-646.

Questions: QS 15-1 to 15-14.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 348, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 612:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide. 

Quiz. 

5-6

Long-term investments and international transactions:  classifying investments, long-term investments in securities, investments in international operations, comprehensive income. 

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps used to solve it. 

Practice:  discussion of question 14 or 15. 

Review of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 660-676.

Questions:  QS 16-1 to 16-10.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned.

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in 16-1 to 16-10 and describe the steps you used to solve it

 

7-8

Reporting and analyzing cash flows:  basics of cash flow reporting; cash flows from operating, from investing, and from financing. 

Practice:  interpreting and explaining cash flow statements in chapter exhibits. 

Practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation of discussion of "Ethics Challenge" or  "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 738 or 739. 

Review of selected text.

 Review for exam, week 8.

Reading:  pp. 690-723.

Question:  QS 17-1 to 17-12. 

Exercises and Problem Set: as assigned

Respond to either the "Ethics Challenge" or the "Entrepreneurial Decision" problem on pp. 738 or 739, using the questions as a guide.  

Bi-monthly exam, week 8. 

 

9-10

Analysis of financial statements:  basics of analysis; horizontal, vertical, and ratio analysis. 

Practice:  describing one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrating the steps used to solve it. 

Review of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 740-767

Question:  QS 18-1 to 18-6.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

11

 Managerial accounting concepts and principles:  cost accounting concepts; reporting manufacturing activities. 

Review of selected text. 

Reading:  pp. 784-807. 

Questions, Exercises, and Problem Set: as assigned.

 

12

Job order cost accounting:  inventory system and cost accounting, job order cost accounting, adjusting over applied and under applied, overhead. 

Review for exam

Reading:  pp. 826-844. 

Questions, Exercises, and Problem Set:  as assigned

Exam.

rev. 2/04, 2/07, 4/10, 4/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


305  English for Accounting (Advanced II)          60 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

Accounting 304 or equivalent

Textbooks:

Kermit D. Larson et al, Volume II:  Fundamental Accounting Principles With Working Papers, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2002 (or comparable text)

Course Description:

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with basic accounting functions. This fourth course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will reinforce students’ knowledge of:

  • purposes and principles of accounting
  • fundamental accounting procedures
  • analysis and application of various accounting concepts and procedures

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • interpret written accounting and general business language
  • interpret and use visual materials including charts and graphs
  • speak, read, and write about various accounting situations
  • breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions
  • explain the concept and form of accounting information systems
  • apply accounting principles and procedures to process cost accounting, cost allocation and performance measurement, cost-volume-profit analysis, master budgets and planning, flexible budgets and standard costs, and capital budgeting.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • to read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business;
  • to develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions;
  • to interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials;
  • to talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions;
  • to read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions;
  • to explain orally and in writing how businesses communicate with financial statements
  • to apply accounting principles and procedures to process cost accounting, cost allocation and performance measurement, cost-volume-profit analysis, master budgets and planning, flexible budgets and standard costs, and capital budgeting.

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes will include reading, discussion and presentations, instructor and student explanations of accounting principles and procedures, and problem solving through analytical and procedural exercises within real-world business and financial contexts which are premised on English language learning while having accounting content.  .  

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Accounting (Advanced II) topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Review of cost accounting.

Process cost accounting:  comparing job order and process operations; process cost accounting, equivalent units of production, transfers in finished goods inventory and cost of goods sold.

Practice:  prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Discussion of responses to ethics challenge.

Review of selected text.   

Vocabulary log. 

Reading:  pp. 864-889. 

Questions: QS 21.  Answer

Exercises:  as assigned. Problem Set:  as assigned. 

 

3-4

Cost allocation and performance measurement:  overhead coast allocation methods; departmental accounting and departmental expense allocations; responsibility accounting.

Practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe how you would handle the ethics challenge on p. 943-44 or the entrepreneurial decision problem on p.945. 

Review of selected text.  

Quiz. 

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 614-646.

Questions: QS 22.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 943-44, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 945:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide. 

Quiz. 

5-6

Cost-volume-profit analysis:  identifying and measuring cost behavior, break-even analysis, applying cost-volume-profit analysis. 

Practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Practice:  discussion of question 14 or 15. 

Review of selected text.

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 946-964.

Questions:  QS 23.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned.

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it

 

7-8

Master budgets and planning:  budgeting process and administration, master budget.

Practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation of discussion of "Ethics Challenge" or  "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 1014 or 1015. 

Review of selected text.

Review for test

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 980-1001.

Question:  QS 24. 

Exercises and Problem Set: as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 1014, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 1015:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide.

Test.

9-10

Flexible budgets and standard costs:  budgetary process, flexible budget reports, material and labor standards, cost variances, overhead standards and variances, extending standard costs.

Practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation in which you describe one of the problems in the assigned exercises and demonstrate to the class the steps you used to solve it. 

Review of selected text. 

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 1016-

Question:  QS 25.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

In a paragraph or more, explain one of the problems in one of the assigned exercises and describe the steps you used to solve it. 

11-12

Capital budgeting and managerial decisions:  methods using and not using time value of money; decisions and information, managerial decision tasks.

Practice:  Prepare a brief oral presentation of discussion of "Ethics Challenge" or  "Entrepreneurial Decision" problems on pp. 1098 or 1099. 

Review of selected text.

Review for test

Vocabulary log

Reading:  pp. 1060-1083. 

Questions: QS 26.

Exercises and Problem Set:  as assigned

Ethics challenge, p. 1098, or entrepreneurial decision problem on p, 1099:  Write a paragraph or more in response, using the questions as a guide

Test.

rev. 2/04, 4/10, 4/2013, 6/2017


604  English for TASC Preparation (formerly GED High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation) 240 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbook:

Mc-Graw Hill Education Preparation for the TASC Test: The Most Authoritative Guide to the New High School Equivalency Exam, by Kathy Zahler, Diane Zahler, Stephanie Muntone and Thomas Evangelist, 2015

Course Description:

In this “English Through TASC” course students develop English language and foundational skills in:

  • Language Arts:  Reading,
  • Language Arts: Writing,
  • Social Studies,
  • Science, and Mathematics

in order to prepare for TASC or GED exam in English.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English skills in:

  • reading
  • writing
  • social studies
  • science
  • math

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read English critically
  • analyze English reading genres
  • compose grammatically correct and concise English writing compositions
  • interpret social studies English readings and illustrations
  • apply critical English reading skills and scientific information to a variety of  science fields
  • solve math word problems in English using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • solve basic algebra and geometry equations in English
  • perform pre and post GED English practice assessments

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • practice of TASC level skills in language arts:  reading (including critical thinking, meaning, organization, and style in various genres);
  • practice of TASC level skills in language arts: writing (including grammar and usage and independent writing components);
  • review and practice of TASC level skills in social studies (including critical reading of various documents and formats requiring higher order thinking skills and interpretation of  illustrations);
  • review and practice of TASC level skills in science (including critical reading and application of scientific information in various fields of science);
  • review and practice of TASC level skills in mathematics (including the four functions and applications with word problems and problem-solving through basic algebra and geometry); and
  • pre-testing and post-testing practice assessments incorporating TASC-style testing formats in English

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Interactive and engaging student-centered activities to review TASC subjects followed by extensive exercises and practice with simulated and actual test material written by TASC test makers that includes feedback on written texts, including essays, as well as, personalized study plans and effective test taking-strategies which are premised on English language learning while having TASC content.  .

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:

A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for TASC Preparation topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

 

Class Hours

Topics

40

Introduction to the textbook. Introduction to companion websites.

Reading

Reading diagnostic test

Close reading, with an emphasis on non-fiction, for:

         inference and textual evidence;

         determining central themes and ideas;

         summarizing and analyzing the development of themes and characters;

         determining technical, connotative and figurative meanings;

         identifying author’s purpose and tone;

         structural discourse;

         content evaluation presented in diverse media;

         evaluating arguments;

         comparing and contrasting texts;

         vocabulary acquisition and use of vocabulary sufficient for college and career

Strategies for answering Reading questions Guidelines for Personal Study

Practice with TASC-type questions

40

Writing

Grammar and usage diagnostic test

Part 1: Grammar and usage, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, language functions in different contexts

Part 2: Write text, including essays, to:

         analyze substantive topics using arguments and evidence,

         convey complex ideas with organization, development, purpose, and audience awareness

Strategies for answering Writing questions Guidelines for Personal Study

Practice with TASC-type questions

40

Science

Science diagnostic test

Asking questions and defining problems, developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematics and computational thinking, constructing explanations and designing solutions in the following topics:

         Engineering

         Earth and Space Sciences

         Life Sciences

         Physical Sciences

Strategies for answering Science questions Guidelines for Personal Study

Practice with TASC-type questions

40

Social Studies

Social Studies diagnostic test

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships, read and interpret data, compare and contrast multiple perspectives, construct arguments and explanations in the following topics and connect to “real life”:

         US History

         World History

         Civics and Government

         Economics

         Geography

Strategies for answering Social Studies questions Guidelines for Personal Study

Practice with TASC-type questions

40

Mathematics

Mathematics diagnostic test

Reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, model with mathematics, use appropriate tools strategically, attend to precision, look for and make use of structure and express regularity in repeated reasoning in the following areas:

Real Number System

         Integers, Rational numbers, Irrational numbers, Exponents, Roots and Radicals

·        Quantities

·        Computing with Complex Number System Algebra

·        Functions Geometry

·        Statistics and Probability

Strategies for answering Mathematics questions Guidelines for Personal Study

Practice with TASC-type questions

40

Test-taking strategies for TASC test, practicing complete sample tests, including the essay

Final course test

rev 6/2017


605 English For Pre-GED Foundation for GED Preparation       80 hours

Prerequisite:

Placement test. 

Textbook:

Complete Pre-GED:  A Comprehensive Review of the Skills Necessary for GED Study.  McGraw Hill Contemporary, 2003 or comparable edition. 

Course Description:

This “English Through  Pre-GED” course is designed to provide the English language foundation for GED preparation in the areas of Language Arts: Reading, Language Arts: Writing, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. 

Course Goals:

This course develops the student’s English language and test-taking skills in:

  • English reading
  • English writing
  • social studies in English
  • science in English and
  • math in English

Objectives:

By the end of the course, students will have received: 

  • review and practice of English language pre-GED level skills in language arts:  reading (including critical thinking, meaning, organization, and style in various genres);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in language arts: writing (including English grammar and usage and independent writing components);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level English language skills in social studies (including critical reading of various documents and formats requiring higher order thinking skills and interpretation of  illustrations);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in science (including critical reading and application of scientific information in English in various fields of science);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in English in mathematics (including the four functions and applications with word problems and problem-solving through basic algebra and geometry); and
  • pre-testing and post-testing practice assessments incorporating GED-style testing formats in English. 

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • practice of pre-GED level skills in language arts:  reading (including critical thinking, meaning, organization, and style in various genres);
  • practice of pre-GED level skills in language arts: writing (including grammar and usage and independent writing components);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in social studies (including critical reading of various documents and formats requiring higher order thinking skills and interpretation of  illustrations);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in science (including critical reading and application of scientific information in various fields of science);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in mathematics (including the four functions and applications with word problems and problem-solving through basic algebra and geometry); and
  • pre-testing and post-testing practice assessments incorporating GED-style testing formats

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classroom review of pre-GED skills followed by extensive exercises and practice with periodic pre- and post-testing and assessment which are premised on English language learning while having pre-GED content.  

Grading:   The final grade is based on the following: 

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D-65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Pre-GED Foundation topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 Weeks

Topics

 

1-3

Language Arts:  Reading

 

 

Gaining meaning from words, understanding what you have read, finding hidden meaning, organizing ideas, understanding fiction, understanding poetry and drama.

Language Arts:  Reading Chapters 1-6, pp. 189-327. 

 

Reading pre-and post-tests. 

4-6

 

 

 

Parts of speech, sentences, nouns and pronouns, verbs, subject-verb agreement, adjectives and adverbs, combining sentences and organizing paragraphs, sentences and paragraphs. 

Language Arts:  Writing Chapters 1-8, pp. 45-177. 

 

Writing pre- and post-tests. 

7-10

Social Studies

 

 

Understanding readings, interpreting graphic materials, applying information in social studies, analyzing social studies materials, evaluating social studies materials. 

Review for bi-monthly exam. 

Social Studies Chapters 1-5, pp. 341-487. 

 

Social Studies pre- and post-tests. 

 

Week 8:  bi-monthly exam. 

 

Science

 

11-13

Science knowledge and skills, living things, human biology, physics, chemistry, earth and space science.

Science Chapters 1-6, pp. 501-641.

 

Science pre- and post-tests.

 

Mathematics

 

14-16

Whole numbers, using a calculator, solving word problems, decimals, fractions, ratio and proportion, data and probability, basic algebra, measurement and geometry. 

Review for bi-monthly exam. 

Mathematics Chapters 1-10, pp. 653-819. 

 

Mathematics pre- and post-tests. 

 

Week 16:  Bi-monthly exam. 

rev June, 2011, 4/2013, 6/2017


610  English for TOEFL Exam Preparation         80 hours

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Deborah Phillips, Longman Preparation Course For The TOEFL Test:  Next Generation iBT, 2nd ed.  Pearson, 2007 (or comparable text).  Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through TOEFL Prep” course students develop English language skills. The course helps prepare advanced ESL students for the TOEFL through the application of advanced integrated English language skills tested by the Next Generation iBT.

This course is not designed or intended to prepare students for college-level, academic work.

Course Goals:

This course will prepare students’ to take the TOEFL exam

Objectives: 

Students will be able to:

  • apply TOEFL-like English language skills
  • indicate familiarity with Next Generation iBT test-taking strategies
  • recognize TOEFL-like test conditions through practice tests

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • strengthen the application of integrated English language skills in TOEFL-like contexts. 
  • provide understanding of and experience with TOEFL Next Generation iBT test-taking strategies with its emphasis upon integrated English language skills testing. 
  • provide practice test taking under TOEFL-like conditions

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classroom instruction includes timed and untimed practice exercises similar to TOEFL questions and situations.  Students listen to pre-recorded listening material and have supplementary CD ROM material with additional practice exercises and two actual TOEFL iBT tests which are premised on English language learning while having TOEFL iBT content.   

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for TOEFL Exam Preparation topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Weeks

Objectives

Skills Sets, Exercises, Exams

1-4

Reading

 

1

 

Reading Diagnostic and Overview

Skills 1-3:  Understanding vocabulary from context.  Recognizing referents.  Simplifying sentence meaning

Mini-Tests

Reading diagnostic pre-test

Vocabulary, References, and Sentence exercises 1-3

Selected Mini-Tests assigned as homework.

2

Skills 4-6:  Sentence insertion. Finding factual information. Understanding negative facts

Mini-Tests

Sentence and Detail exercises 4-6

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

3

Skills 7-8:  Making inferences from stated facts. Inferring rhetorical purpose

Mini-Tests

Reading Review Exercise (Skills 1-6)

Inference exercises 7-8

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

4

Skill 9-10:  Selecting summary information. Completing schematic tables

Reading Post-Test

Reading to Learn exercises 9-10

Reading Review exercise (skills 1-10)

Reading Post-Test

5-8

Listening

 

5

Listening Diagnostic Pre-Test and Overview

Skills 1-2: Understanding the gist and details

Mini-Tests

Listening Pre-Test

Listening exercises 1-2

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

6

Skills 13-4:  Understanding the function and speaker’s stance

Mini-Tests

Listening exercises 3-4

Listening Review exercises 1-4

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

7

Skill 5-6:  Understanding the organization and relationships

Mini-Tests

Listening exercises 5-6

8

Post-test

Bi-monthly exam

Listening Review exercise

Listening Post-Test

Bimonthly exam.  

9-12

Speaking

 

9

Speaking Diagnostic and Overview

Independent Tasks:

Skills 1-2:  Planning and making the free-choice response

Skill 3-4:  Planning and making the paired-choice response

Mini-Tests

Speaking Diagnostic Pre-Test

 

Speaking exercises 1-4

 

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

10

Integrated Tasks (Reading and Listening):

Skills 5-6:  Noting the main points as you read and listen

Skills 7-8:  Planning and making the response

Skill 9-Noting the main points as you read

Mini-Tests

Review exercises, skills 1-4.

Skills exercises 6-8

Review exercises, skills 6-8

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

11

Integrated Tasks (Reading and Listening) [continued...]

Skill 10-Noting the main points as you read and listen

Skills 11-12:  Planning and making the response

Integrated Tasks (Listening): 

Skill 13-Noting the main points as you listen

Skills 14-15:  Planning and making the response

Mini-Tests

 

Integrated skills exercises 10-12

 

Integrated Speaking Review exercise, skills 13-15

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

12

Integrated Tasks (Listening) [continued...]

Skill 16-Noting the main points as you listen

Skills 17-18:  Planning and making the response

Speaking Post-Test

Integrated skills exercises 16-18

Integrated speaking review exercise, skills 16-18

Speaking Post-Test

Weeks 13-16

 
Writing

 

13

Writing Diagnostic and Overview

Integrated Writing Task: 

Skills 1-2:  Noting the main points as you read and listen

Skill 3-Planning before you write

Skill 4-Writing a topic sentence

Skill 5-Writing unified supporting paragraphs

Mini-Tests

Writing Diagnostic Pre-Test

 

Skills exercises 1-5

 

 

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

14

Integrated Writing Task (continued...): 

Skills 6-7:  Reviewing sentence structure and grammar

Integrated Writing Review, skills 1-7

Independent Writing Task:

Skill 8-Planning before you write

Skills 9-10:  Writing the introduction and unified supporting paragraphs

Mini-Tests

 

Skills exercises 6-10

 

 

 

 

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

15

Independent Writing Task (continued...)

Skill 11-Connecting the supporting paragraphs

Skill 12-Writing the conclusion

Skills 13-14:  Reviewing sentence structure and grammar

Mini-Tests

 

Skills exercises 11-14

 

Mini-Test selections assigned as homework.

16

Writing Post-Test

Bi-monthly exam

Independent Writing review exercise for skills 8-10

Writing Post-Test

Bi-monthly exam. 

rev. 6/06, 2/07, 2/08, 4/10, 4/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


940  English for Introduction to Microsoft Windows         80 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Suzanne Weixel, Learning Microsoft Windows XP, DDC Publishing, 2002 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through MS Windows” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully understand and complete concepts, features, functions, and applications in Windows.  

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:  skills using Windows functions and features in English

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • interpret textbook readings and directions in English
  • use clear concise English to ask questions
  • explain Windows procedures using clear concise English
  • discuss the basics of Windows operating system
  • navigate Windows toolbar and menus to customize projects

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read about Windows in English and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • read and follow directions in English    when practicing textbook exercises;
  • ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;
  • explain to others procedures used or results obtained;
  • understand the basics of the Windows operating system;
  • understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Windows; and
  • understand how to use other Windows features.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include theory and development sessions followed by hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output which are premised on English language learning while having Microsoft Windows content.   

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Introduction to Microsoft Windows topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 WP=word processing exercises, SS=spreadsheet exercises, DB=database exercises, INT= integration exercises

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Mapping the text and course:  introduction to the course and the book, including learning aids

Getting started with Windows XP

Review and discussion: mini-case situations.

Exercises:  1-7.

 

 

2-3

Windows organization:  storage devices, folders, files, recycle bin

Review and discussion: selected case

 Exercises 8-15

 

4-5

Using Windows programs:  Task Manager, Notepad, Accessories, Calculator, Paint, Address Book

Review and discussion: selected  case

Exercises 16-21

6-7

More Windows programs:  Explorer, Clipboard, Search, Help and Support

Review and discussion: selected  case

Exercises 22-29

 

8-9

Customize Windows XP:  Control Panel, Screen Saver, Style, Date and Time, Numbers, Mouse settings, etc. 

Review and discussion: on the job situation. 

Review for exam

Exercises 30-37

 

 

 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 8.

10-11

More Customization:  Folder options, folder toolbars, adding icons to desktop, adding a program, adding new hardware, managing the print queue

Review and discussion: on the job and selected  situations

Exercises 38-44

 

 

12-13

System Maintenance:  formatting disks, disk cleanup, defragmentation, compressing folders, using the Backup or Restore Wizard, using System Restore, Viewing System Information, Using Troubleshooters

Review and discussion: on the job and selected situations. 

Exercises 45-51.

 

14-15

Digital Media and Workgroups:  using Media Player, copying music, creating play lists, managing picture files, printing images, importing pictures from a scanner or camera, managing picture files, setting up a home or small business network, internet connection sharing, control sharing, hidden or read-only files, using Remote Desktop, etc. 

Review and discussion: on the job and selected situations. 

Exercises 52-60

 

16

Review for exam. 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 16. 

rev. 2/04, 3/07, 4/10, 4/2013, 6/2017


950  English for Using Excel          80 Classes

PREREQUISITE: 

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbook:

Steve Schwartz, Microsoft Office 2008 (Part III, Chapters 9 to 16), Prachtree Press, 2008 (or comparable text). 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through Excel” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully execute operations in Excel.  This course introduces students to English language spreadsheet concepts, features, functions, and applications using Excel.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:  English skills to navigate Excel in English

OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

  • analyze and demonstrate use of Excel spreadsheets in English
  • identify uses of  Excel in everyday situations in English
  • use Excel toolbars and menus to customize projects
  • apply other Excel features

Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • use English spreadsheets, in general, and Excel, in particular;
  • understand in English how Excel can be applied to real world situations;
  • navigate English toolbars and use English  menus to customize Excel; and
  • use other Excel features in English.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having Excel content.    Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Using Excel topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

  WP=word processing exercises, SS=spreadsheet exercises, DB=database exercises, INT= integration exercises

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Mapping the text and course:  introduction to the course and the book, including learning aids

Basics:  spreadsheets and Excel

Basics:  computer hardware and software; help functions, worksheets, managing multiple workbooks; internet basics, etc.

Review:  mini-case situations.

Exercises:  1-5.

 

 

2

Key worksheet procedures:  starting, saving, and closing a workbook; entering data; changing and adjusting rows and heights; changing workbook properties; creating folders and backup files, etc. 

Enumerating transition words in giving directions

Close case reading

Exercises 6-11

3

Using formulas and formatting:  using formulas' formatting data with Toolbar, fonts, symbols, numbers; copying data; creating a series; etc.

Using other transition words in giving directions. 

Close case reading. 

Exercises 12-18

4

Printing a worksheet:  previewing, print options & page setup; page breaks, headers, and footers; etc.

Review: on the job. 

Exercises 19-23

5-6

Editing and manipulating worksheets & workbooks

Practice:  explaining the information on Exercise 31's Expense Statement

Review: on the job situations

Exercises 24-33.

7-8

Modifying the appearance of a worksheet.

Review:  on the job thinking. 

Practice:  explaining to others how you modified the appearance of a worksheet to make it more effective.

Review for exam.   

Exercises 34-41.

 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 8.

9

Integrating Excel with other applications and with the Internet:  object and file linking and embedding; integrating office documents; saving a worksheet as a Web page; importing/exporting text files, tables, and data from other applications.

Review:  on the job thinking. 

Exercises 42-46

10-11

Using advanced Excel functions

Review:  on the job and selected  situations

describing the information presented on the spreadsheet in exercise 47.

Discussing "what-if" situations. 

Exercises 47-57

 

12-13

Creating and modifying charts.

Practice:  interpret the information provided by the charts in exercises 58, 61, 62, 63, & 64.

Review:  on the job thinking. 

Exercises 58-68.

 

14-15

Analyzing data: creating a list/database; modifying a record; controlling data entry; sorting records, advanced filters, using database (list) functions, creating PivotTables and Pivot Charts, data consolidation, etc. 

Review:  on the job thinking. 

Exercises 69-79

 

16

Creating macros and hyperlinks

Review:  on the job thinking. 

Review for exam. 

Exercises 80-83

 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 16. 

rev. 2/04, 3/07, 4/10, 4/2013, 6/2017


955  English for Using the Internet          80 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Don Mayo and Catherine Skintik, Learning the Internet:  Fundamentals, Projects, and Exercises, DDC Publishing, (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Using The Internet” course students develop English language skills needed to be successful with the structure of the Internet.  The course provides English direction and practice in using the Internet correctly to obtain valid information for personal, for business, and for academic use.   The course emphasizes good searching skills and includes practice in developing a personal English web page.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ ability to:

  • read and interpret internet basics through written English
  • read and interpret textbook exercises in written English
  • verbally explain internet procedures in English
  • distinguish between valid and invalid internet information
  • create a personal web page

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read and interpret internet basics through written English
  • read and interpret textbook exercises in written English
  • verbally explain internet procedures in English
  • distinguish between valid and invalid internet information
  • create a personal web page
  • demonstrate use of  the World Wide Web and its features.

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read about Internet basics and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • ask English questions concerning concepts and implementation;
  • explain procedures used or results obtained;
  • understand in English the basics of Internet searching that produces valid information for personal, for business, and for academic use;
  • understand how to create a personal web page; and
  • understand in English how to use other World Wide Web features.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include development and theory  sessions followed by hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all kills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having Using the Internet content.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Using the Internet topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Mapping the text and course:  introduction to the course and the book, including learning aids

Introduction to the Internet and WWW:  Internet history; Internet ethics and netiquette, establishing an Internet connection, Web page basics

Lesson 1 and Appendix C

Exercises: 2.  answer each question. 

Create a set of guidelines for working on the Internet. 

2-3

Using the Internet Explorer Web Browser:  opening, navigating, and closing web pages; storing links to favorite web pages; moving between links and web pages; finding text on a web page, using Explorer tools and menus; saving and downloading Web pages in a variety of formats; etc. 

Using enumerating transition words to give directions.

Lesson 2 text. Do Lesson 2 exercises.

Explain the purpose of the Quicken portion of exercise 6 and explain what information can be found on the Quicken.com web site.

4-5

Searching the Web:  using search engines and choosing appropriate search engines; choosing keywords and narrowing and expanding a search; creating search strings; using natural language queries; finding and using different advanced search options; & developing other search techniques. 

Using other transition words in giving directions. 

Individual oral reports:  results of Internet search. 

Viruses and Trojans. 

Plagiarism.

Individual oral reports.   

Lesson 3 and Appendix B. 

Lesson 3 exercises.

Choose a subject you explored in the exercises  Be prepared to give a brief report.

1.        define "viruses" and "Trojans" and explain ways to deal with them.

2.        Look up the dictionary definition of "plagiarism."  Report on what you have learned about plagiarism and ways to avoid it.  

8-9

Using Outlook Express:  using e-mail effectively; enabling HTML formatting, applying stationery, inserting a picture and/or links; using address book; etc.

Individual oral report—the most useful thing learned so far about the Internet. 

Review for exam.

Read Lesson 4.

Complete Lesson 4 exercises.

Describe everything you now know about the Internet.  Be prepared to give a brief oral report. 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 16. 

10-11

Information literacy:  searching automated library catalogs and periodical databases; constructing a valid search; narrowing and expanding your search; applying criteria to distinguish valid from invalid information.

Obtaining a public library card (handout).  

1.        Explain three shared features of Internet, electronic library catalog, and periodical database searches. 

2.        Go to one of the college library links on the Institute Library homepage and search for books on a certain topic.  Explain three features shared by the external library search software and that used by the Spanish-American Institute Library  (include bookmaking)

3.        Show your public library card to your instructor.  

4.        Define a search topic for your individual final project.  Explain the topic you will research using one library automated catalog, a full-text periodical database, and one or more Internet sites. 

12-14

Creating a Web page:  authoring & publishing a web site; using Work templates; inserting pictures & other items, designing, formatting, & saving a document as a web page; etc.

Read Lesson 5

Lesson 5 exercises. 

Create and publish a personal web page. 

15-16

Complete the final project using on-line library, periodical database, and Internet sources. 

Review for test. 

1.  Explain your topic and how you constructed your search.  Describe how you refined your topic.  List the titles of at least two books you located for your topic, explaining why they should be useful.  Do the same for two on-line periodical courses and two Internet sources. 

2.  Make sure that you have demonstrated the following to your instructor:  a public library card, a personal web page, and the search results in 1, above.

3.  Bi-monthly Exam, week 16.   

rev. 2/04, 3/07, 4/10, 4/2013, 6/2017


 

965 English for Using Microsoft PowerPoint          80 classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks: 

Microsoft Office 2008 for the Macintosh:  Visual QuickStart Guide by Steve Schwartz.  Peachpit Press, 2008.  ISBN 0-321-53400-X. (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through PowerPoint” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully understand and execute PowerPoint multi-media concepts, features, functions, and applications.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English skills through using Microsoft PowerPoint functions and features.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Read and interpret Microsoft PowerPoint basics through written English
  • Read and interpret textbook exercises in written English
  • Use clear concise English to ask questions
  • Explain Microsoft PowerPoint procedures using clear concise English
  • Discuss the basics of Microsoft PowerPoint program
  • Create PowerPoint slides in English

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read about Microsoft PowerPoint basics in English and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • Read and follow directions in English when practicing textbook exercises;
  • Ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • Explain in English procedures used or results obtained regarding the basics of creating a PowerPoint presentation;
  • Use PowerPoint applications to organize and present information in response to specific situations in English;
  • Apply PowerPoint to real world situations;
  • Use English navigation toolbars and menus to customize PowerPoint; and
  • Employ other PowerPoint features in English.

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having PowerPoint content.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Using Microsoft PowerPoint topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 PP=PowerPoint

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Introduction to the course and the book, including learning aids. 

 

Basics:  introduction to PP

Review: on the job

Read "Basics" and Exercise 1 material.

Exercises:  1.

 

2

Creating a new presentation from a template and printing; inserting and importing into slides.

Using enumerating transition words in giving directions

Review: on the job and selected situations

Read material associated with exercises 2-5. 

Exercises 2-5

3

Changing templates and slide layout; using outline view. 

Using other transition words in giving directions. 

Review: on the job and selected situations

Read material associated with exercises 6-9. 

Exercises 6-9

Describe the situation in   exercise 8 or 9 and how you dealt with it

4

Modifying text and changing slides:  selecting, aligning; creating a text box and working with placeholders. 

Practice:  explaining what you did for 10 or 11. 

Review: on the job situations.

Read material associated with exercises 10-11. 

Exercises 10-11.

In a paragraph or more, explain how you changed the appearance of text for either exercise 10 or 11.

5

Modifying text and changing slides:  paragraphing, formatting, color, background, etc. 

Practice:  explaining the effect of PP text choices.  

Review: on the job situations.

Read material associated with exercises 12-14. 

Exercises 12-14.

Describe why your PP choices improved the appearance of the slides for exercise 12 or 13

6

Modifying text and changing slides: customizing a template. 

Review:  on the job and  selected situations

Read material associated with exercises 15-17. 

Exercises 15-17.

Discuss the most effective change you made to the White Water Rafting Guides PP presentation.  Explain why

7

Working with slide objects:  creating and inserting charts and tables.

Practice: interpreting the data on graphs and charts and explaining how PP makes it easier to interpret. 

Review:  on the job situations

 Read material associated with exercises 18-20. 

Exercises 18-20.

One-half the class will explain in writing what the data say in B, exercise 18, and one-half in C.  Both groups will also explain how the PP presentation helps the viewer interpret the data. 

8

Working with slide objects:  pasting, linking, and embedding objects.

Review:  on the job and  selected  situations.

Review for exam

Read material associated with exercises 21-23. 

Exercises 21-23.

 

 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 8

9

Enhancing slides with graphics and objects: using floating toolbars, rulers, and guides: drawing graphic objects; adding AutoShapes; nudging, snapping to, aligning and distributing objects; using WordArt. 

Review:  on the job

Read material associated with exercises 24-26. 

Exercises 24-27.

Describe how the word “nudge” is a good description for the process of nudging in PP. 

10

Other slide enhancements with graphics and objects. 

Practice:  summarize what you did in the situation about which you wrote. 

Review:  on the job and  selected  situations.

.

Read material associated with exercises 28-30. 

Exercises 28-30.

Explain how you made the Smithfield Antique Mall or Golf Club's presentation more interesting with the PP element that you believe helped the most.  Explain

11

Working with slide shows:  adding transitions and sound; using animation; inserting comments, etc.

Review:  on the job situations.

Read material associated with exercises 31-33. 

Exercises 31-33.

Describe the process of animating slides in PP. 

12

Working with slide shows:  adding narrations and music; using pack and go; using meeting minder; setting up and running presentations.

Oral discussion:  how you think you will use PP

Review:  on the job situations.

Read material associated with exercises 34-37. 

Exercises 34-37.

Write a letter to a friend who does not use PP in which you explain what you can do in PP. 

13

Working with slide shows:  exporting to transparencies and 35mm slides.

Review:  on the job and  selected  situations.

Read material associated with exercises 38-40. 

Exercises 38-40.

Describe the most interesting PP presentation you have designed so far

14

PowerPoint and the Web:  Internet basics, getting clip art, images, media, sound clips, and text from the Web. 

Review:  on the job situations.

Read material associated with exercises 41-43. 

Exercises 41-43.

Follow the directions for "on your own," exercise 43.  Describe the two pieces of clip art you found, how you found it, and why you think it improves your PP presentation. 

15

PowerPoint and the Web:  creating hyperlinks, saving presentations as a web site, and publishing them.

Review:  on the job situations.

Read material associated with exercises 44-47. 

Exercises 44-47.

16

Putting it all together. 

Review:   selected  situations. 

Prepare for exam. 

Read material associated with exercises 48-50. 

Exercises 48-50.

Bi-monthly Exam.

rev. 2/04, 3/07, 4/10, 3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


 

975  English for Using Adobe Photoshop                            160 classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Lisa A. Buck, Learning Adobe Photoshop CS2, DDC Publishing, (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through PhotoShop” course students develop English language skills needed to be successful with PhotoShop. Students will learn how to work with PhotoShop images from a variety of real world situations and sources.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English knowledge and skills by using PhotoShop.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Read and interpret written PhotoShop directions for textbook exercises in English
  • Express questions clearly and concisely regarding PhotoShop
  • Explain PhotoShop procedures using clear concise English
  • Discuss the basics of the PhotoShop program
  • Use the basics of PhotoShop from a variety of real world situations and sources to design, develop and customize images

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read about PhotoShop basics and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • Read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • Ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • Explain procedures used or results obtained regarding the basics of PhotoShop;
  • Write simple explanations of procedures used or results obtained
  • Use PhotoShop applications to design, develop, and customize images;
  • Employ the basics of creating PhotoShop images from sources;
  • Apply PhotoShop to real world situations;
  • Use navigation toolbars and menus to customize PhotoShop; and
  • Use other PowerPoint features.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having PhotoShop content.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Using Adobe PhotoShop topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

PS=Photoshop

Weeks

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

Introduction to the course and the book. 

Basics:  introduction to PS; the PS screen, menus, toolbars, and commands; using help features; etc.  

Read Chapter 1 and follow the directions for touring the work area.  Exercise:  1.

3-4

Working with image files; storing images digitally; creating a new file, importing a scanner or digital camera image, adding file information. 

Read Chapter 2 and follow the directions for working with image files.  Exercise:  2.

Describe how to use transparent background and describe its effect.   

5-6

Adding content with Tools:  choosing tools, setting options, painting, drawing, adding text, and creating a note on an image.

Oral presentation:  describe one Tool and its use.   .

Read Chapter 3 and directions for adding content with Tools. Exercise:  3

Describe two Tools, what they do, and how to use them in PS. 

7-8

Working with the Image View:  zooming, viewing pixel or print size, scrolling, moving around with Hand tool and Navigator. 

Selecting image content:  selecting shapes and colors.   

Explain what you did in either exercise 4 or 5.  .

Read Chapter 4 and follow the directions for working with the Image View.  Exercise:  4.

Read Chapter 5 and follow the directions for selecting image content.  Exercise:  5.

Bi-monthly Exam, week 8. 

9-10

Changing a selection:  transforming or rotating a selection, fine-tuning selection marquee, working with the History palette.

Using positioning tools: 

Explain what you did in either exercise 6 or 7.

Read Chapter 6 and follow the directions for changing a selection.  Exercise:  6.

Read Chapter 7 and follow the directions for using positioning tools.  Exercise:  7.

11-12

Working with layers:  creating, selecting, changing, arranging, and merging layers.

 

 

Read Chapter 8 and follow the directions for working in layers.   Exercise 8. 

Explain what layers do in PS and how your used layers in the exercise. 

13-14

Adding variety with masks:  setting options, working in Quick Mask, creasing and using a layer mask.

Using paths:  creating, viewing, and working with paths. 

Read Chapter 9 and follow the directions for adding variety with masks.  Exercise:  9.

Read Chapter 10 and follow the directions for using paths.  .Exercise:  10.

15-16

Using other editing tools:  adding blurring or smudging; sharpening; erasing color; adding fill; dodging, burning, or sponging an area. 

Review for exam

 Read Chapter 11 and follow the directions for using other editing tools.  Exercise:  11

 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 16

17-18

Working with image size and orientation:  cropping, resizing, adjusting the canvas, rotating the canvas, and trimming the edges of an image.

Using a filter:  applying and adjusting the filter. 

Read Chapter 12 and directions for working with image size and orientation.  Exercise:  12.

Read Chapter 13 and directions for using a filter.  Exercise:  13.

19-20

Printing your image:  using transfer settings to correct color; adding a border, bleed, or background; printing with special marks and features, etc.

Oral presentation:  describe one way that Photoshop and Word print features differ.   

Read Chapter 14 and follow the directions for printing your images.  Exercise:  14.

Explain at least two ways that the print features of Photoshop differ from those in Word.  

21-22

Understanding colors and channels:  calibrating your monitor; converting an image to another color, proofing image color. 

Discuss how you think you will use PS in the future. 

 Read Chapter 15 and follow the directions for touring the work area.  Exercise:  15.

Write a letter to a friend to explain what you can do in PS. 

23-24

Correcting image color:  adjusting tones, rebalancing color, changing brightness and contrast, etc.

Having fun with color:  adding spot color, making a duotone print; converting to sepia.

Read Chapter 16 and directions for correcting image color.  Exercise:  16.

Read Chapter 17 and directions for having fun with color.  Exercise:  17.

Bi-monthly Exam, week 24. 

25-26

Working with plug-ins:  installing and using a plug-in.

Oral presentation:  make a short oral presentation about the PS project you have found most interesting to date. 

Read Chapter 18 and follow the directions for working with plug-ins.  Exercise:  18.

Describe the most interesting PS project you have worked on so far and explain why you think it is so.

27-28

Working with actions:  recording and playing an action; making and using a droplet. 

Digital watermark protection. 

Review and discussion:  watermark protection and other intellectual property rights. 

Read Chapter 19 and directions for working with actions.  Exercise:  19.

Read appendix A, p. 315.  Explain what intellectual property rights are and what digital watermark protection does.

29-30

Creating Web images:  reviewing Web graphic formats, converting an image to indexed color, and creating optimized JPEG and GIF images. 

Using online resources to learn more about PS:

Describe one on-line resource from the research and writing assignment. 

Read Chapter 20 and follow the directions for creating Web images.  Exercise:  20.

Visit at least two on-line resources to learn more about PS and write a short explanation about the information they contain. 

31-32

Adding hotspots:  adding and working with slices and saving a sliced image in HTML format. 

Prepare for exam. 

Read Chapter 21 and follow the directions for touring the work area.  Exercise:  21.

Bi-monthly Exam, week 32.

rev. 4/02, 3/07, 4/10, 3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


 

990  English for Introduction to Mac      80 classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

The Little MAC Book:  Snow Leopard Edition by Robin Williams, Peachpit Press, 2010 (or comparable text). 

Other Instructional Material:

Apple’s on-line tutorials at:  http://www.apple.com/support/mac101/

Course Description:

In this “English Through Introduction To MAC” course students develop English language skills to be successful with the Mac OSX operating system and Mac computers.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will explain features and basic usage of the MAC operating system in English

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • interpret English readings and verbal explanations regarding Macintosh computers
  • use the Apple support site to locate answers to specific questions
  • create questions in English about concepts or procedures
  • explain procedures and results
  • identify the basics of Macintosh’s OS X v 10.6 Snow Leopard operating system
  • navigate Mac toolbars and menus
  • use Mac features

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read in English about Macintosh computers and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • use the Apple Macintosh English support site to use Mac computers effectively and efficiently and to answer specific questions;
  • read and follow directions in English when practicing exercises;
  • ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • explain to others procedures used or results obtained;
  • understand the basics of Macintosh’s OS X v10.6 Snow Leopard operating system in English;
  • to understand how to navigate English toolbars and use English menus to customize the Mac; and
  • to understand how to use other Mac features in English.

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having introduction to MAC content.   Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Introduction to MAC topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1-2

The Mac map:  desktop, menu bar, Finder windows, folders in Home window, keys

Accessing Apple’s Mac 101 on-line tutorial at http://www.apple.com/support/mac101/:  Mac 101 initiation lessons on-line. 

Read chapter 1, “A map of your Mac” and perform each step using the Mac Desktop.

 

On-line:  MAC 101 “The Grand Tour”

3

Using the Mac mouse to perform Mac basics: single-click functions, double-click functions, press and press-and drag functions, hover, and track pads. Advanced mouse functions with shift-click, command-click, option-click, and control-click and –drag. 

Read chapter 2, text and do all exercises.

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Mac Essentials,” Pointing, Clicking, and Getting Around

4

The Dock:  display item names, resize the Dock, remove an item, rearrange, add an item, magnify an item, reposition the Dock, Dock troubleshooting

Read chapter 3, “The Dock” and follow all directions. 

 

On-line:  Mac 101 Introduction, Lesson 4—The Dock, Dock Expose, and Stacks

5

Finder:  using different window views of the same content, resizing windows, scrolling, quick look, sidebar, window buttons, creating your own folders

Chapter 4, read “Finder Windows” and do all exercises.

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Introduction,” Lesson 1, The Finder

6

Menus and Shortcuts:  choosing a menu command, gray vs. black commands, hierarchical menus, ellipses in menus, contextual menus, keyboard shortcuts

Chapter 5, read “Menus & Shortcuts” and do all exercises. 

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Introduction,” Lesson 3, the Menu Bar

7-8

Using Applications:  open an application, open a blank document, I-beam, insertion point, delete or backspace, select text, change fonts, alignment, cut/copy/clipboard, paste undo, shortcuts, document windows

 

Review for exam

Chapter 6, read “Use an Application,” and do all exercises. 

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Introduction,” Lesson 5, Applications, Files, and Folders

 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 8.

9

Save and Print:  save, making different versions of same document, print and print specifications, adding a printer, page setup, print queue window

Chapter 7, read “Save & Print” and do all exercises.

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Connect and Use Devices,” Lesson 2, Connect and Use Your Printer

10

Close, Quit, and Trash:  close vs. quit, quit applications,  trash a file

Chapter 8, read “Close, Quit & Trash” and do all exercises.

 

11

Get Connected:  step-by-step, Mobile Me, using Network Preferences, setting up a broadband connection

Chapter 9, read “Get Connected” and follow directions.

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Connect and Use Devices,” Lesson 3, Connect to the Internet

12-13

Surf the Web:  web pages, links, web addresses, choosing a home page, Bookmarks, History, search tools, URLs

Chapter 10, read “Surf the Web” and do all exercises. 

 

On-Line:  Mac 101 “All Work and Play--Introduction,” Lesson 22, Safari

14

E-Mail:  set up an account, sending and receiving mail, replying to messages, attaching a file, opening an attachment, creating a note, address book, group mailing lists

Chapter 1, read “Let’s Do E-mail” and do all exercises. 

 

On-Line:  Mac 101 “All Work and Play-Introduction,” Lesson 19, Mail; Lesson 2, Address Book;

15

More Useful Features:  system preferences, aliases, using Spotlight to find files, stickies, burning CDs and DVDs, Expose, Dashboard widgets, Sleep, etc.

 

 

Chapter 12,  read “Other Useful Features,” and do exercises. 

 

On-Line:  Mac 101 “All Work and Play-Introduction ,” Lessons 5, 8, 24—Expose, Dashboard, Spotlight

16

Even More Useful Features: Mac Troubleshooting,  Quick Assist,  plus at least one other useful features from Mac 101 “All Work and Play,” such as Automate, Boot Camp, Garage Band, iMovie, iTunes, iWeb, Spaces, Text Edit, etc., depending on individual student interest and need

Review for Exam 

On-Line:  “Quick Assist” and Mac 101 “My Mac Needs Help” and “All Work and Play-Introduction” (selected lesson).

 

 

 

Bi-monthly Exam, week 16

3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


995  English For Switching to Mac         80 classes

Prerequisite(s):

Any Microsoft Office application course.

Textbooks:

The Little MAC Book:  Snow Leopard Edition by Robin Williams, Peachpit Press, 2010 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Switching To MAC” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully transition from a Windows PC to a Mac OS environment.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English skills in using Mac functions and features.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Read and interpret Mac basics through written English
  • Read and interpret textbook exercises in written English
  • Use clear concise English to ask questions
  • Explain Mac procedures using clear concise English
  • Discuss the basics of Mac program in English

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read in English about Mac and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • Read and interpret in English Mac support site to use Mac computers effectively and efficiently;
  • Follow directions in English when practicing textbook exercises;
  • Ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • Explain to others in English procedures used or results obtained;
  • Understand the basics of Mac operating system described in English;
  • Use English navigation toolbars and menus to customize the Mac;
  • Use other Mac features in English

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having switching to MAC content.   Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Switching to MAC topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

The Mac map:  desktop, menu bar, Finder windows, folders in Home window, keys

 

Using the Mac mouse to perform Mac basics: single-click functions, double-click functions, press and press-and drag functions, hover, and track pads. Advanced mouse functions with shift-click, command-click, option-click, and control-click and –drag. 

 

Accessing Apple’s Switch 101: Migrate to the Mac and  Mac 101 on-line tutorials at http://www.apple.com/support/:   Switch 101and Mac 101 initiation lessons on-line. 

Read chapter 1, “A map of your Mac” and perform each step using the Mac Desktop. Read chapter 2, text and do all exercises.

 

On-line:  MAC 101 “The Grand Tour” and  “Mac Essentials,” Pointing, Clicking, and Getting Around and Switch 101 “Welcome to the Mac”

2

The Dock:  display item names, resize the Dock, remove an item, rearrange, add an item, magnify an item, reposition the Dock, Dock troubleshooting

 

Finder:  using different window views of the same content, resizing windows, scrolling, quick look, sidebar, window buttons, creating your own folders

Read chapter 3, “The Dock” and Chapter 4, “Finder Windows” and do all exercises.

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Introduction,” Lesson 1, The Finder and Lesson 4—The Dock, Dock Expose, and Stacks

3

Menus and Shortcuts:  choosing a menu command, gray vs. black commands, hierarchical menus, ellipses in menus, contextual menus, keyboard shortcuts

 

Using Applications:  open an application, open a blank document, I-beam, insertion point, delete or backspace, select text, change fonts, alignment, cut/copy/clipboard, paste undo, shortcuts, document windows

Chapter 5, read “Menus & Shortcuts” and

Chapter 6,  “Use an Application,” and do all exercises

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Introduction,” Lesson 3, the Menu Bar“ and Lesson 5, Applications, Files, and Folders

4

Save and Print:  save, making different versions of same document, print and print specifications, adding a printer, page setup, print queue window

 

Close, Quit, and Trash:  close vs. quit, quit applications,  trash a file

Chapter 7, read “Save & Print” and Chapter 8, read “Close, Quit & Trash” and do all exercises.

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Connect and Use Devices,” Lesson 2, Connect and Use Your Printer

5-6

Migrate Windows files from PC to Mac:  using external or removable media, a network connection, direct connect, network connection, or alternative methods.  Migrating Mail. 

Switch 101: “Migrate Your Files”

7

Migrate Windows System:  Migrating Windows with Boot Camp, installing and using Boot Camp

Switch 101: “Migrate Your Files—Migrating Windows with Boot Camp”

8

Get Connected:  step-by-step, Mobile Me, using Network Preferences, setting up a broadband connection, connecting other peripherals

 

Review for exam

Chapter 9, read “Get Connected” and follow directions.

 

On-line:  Mac 101 “Connect and Use Devices,” Lesson 3, Connect to the Internet.  Switch 101: “Migrate Your Files—Connect Your Peripherals”

Bi-monthly Exam, week 8.

9-10

Using Mac software to surf the Web:  web pages, links, web addresses, choosing a home page, Bookmarks, History, search tools, URLs.

 

E-Mail:  set up an account, sending and receiving mail, replying to messages, attaching a file, opening an attachment, creating a note, address book, group mailing lists.

Chapter 10, read “Surf the Web” and  Chapter 11,“Let’s Do E-mail” and do all exercises

 

On-Line:  Mac 101 “All Work and Play, Introduction” Lesson 22, Safari and Lesson 19, Mail; Lesson 2, Address Book;

11

Customizing Your Mac:  make your Mac work for you, create multiple accounts, customize its look and feel, set preferences, etc. 

 

More Useful Features:  system preferences, aliases, using Spotlight to find files, stickies, burning CDs and DVDs, Expose, Dashboard widgets, Sleep, etc.

Chapter 12,  read “Other Useful Features,” and do exercises. 

 

On-Line:  Switch 101:   “Show Me How to Set Up My Mac for Me” and Mac 101 “Customize Your Mac” and “All Work and Play,” Lessons 5, 8, 24—Expose, Dashboard, Spotlight

12

Mac Troubleshooting

 

On-Line:  “Troubleshooting 101:  Quick Assist” and Mac 101 “My Mac Needs Help”

13

Other Mac features:  Automator, Font Book, Dictionary Preview, Text Edit, Time Machine, DVD player,  Spaces

Mac 101:  “All Work and Play:  Introduction,” Lessons 3, 6,7, 9, 23, 26

14

 Other Mac features, QuickTime Player, GarageBand, iCal, iChat, iSync

 Mac 101:  “All Work and Play:  Introduction,” Lessons 10, 11, 12, 16,

15

Other Mac features: iDVD, iPhoto, iTunes, iMovie

Mac 101:  “All Work and Play, Introduction” Lessons 13, 14, 15, 17

16

Using iWeb to create websites and blogs with podcasts, photos, movies, etc.   

Review for Exam 

Mac 101:  “All Work and Play, Introduction” Lesson 18

Bi-monthly Exam, week 16

3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


 

1000  English for Using Apple iMovie                           80 classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

iMovie & iDVD:  The Missing Manual, David Pogue and Aaron Miller, O’Reilly Media/Pogue Press:  2009 (or recent edition). 

Other Instructional Aids:

Apple’s on-line tutorials, iMovie and iDVD, www.apple,com/ilife/imovie,  www.apple,com/ilife/iphoto, www.apple,com/ilife/idvd

Course Description:

In this “English Through iMovie” course students develop English language skills to be successful with Apple iMovie.  Students will learn how to create movies on the computer using a variety of media and to output their movies to tape or disk, send them via e-mail, or post them to a web site. 

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:  knowledge and usage of iMovie

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read and interpret English written iMovie directions for textbook exercises
  • interpret documents and situations written in English to design, develop, and customize iMovie applications for various situations
  • express question in English regarding iMovie
  • write simple iMovie procedures and results in English
  • explain the design and content of iMovie and iDVD
  • use the basics of gathering video assets, trimming and organizing them, garnishing them with title tracks, special effects, and transitions.
  • modify and use iMovie to create stand-alone movies; and output their created videos to tape or disk, e-mail, or the Web.

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read in English about video editing software and iMovie and understand what is being discussed or described IN English;
  • read and follow English directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • read English documents and descriptions of situations and decide in English how to use iMovie applications to design, develop, and customize video compositions;
  • ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • write simple English explanations of procedures used or results obtained;
  • explain in English the design and content of iMovie and iDVD presentations; and
  • understand the basics of gathering video assets; of trimming and organizing them; of garnishing them with title tracks, special effects, and transitions; of using iMovie to create stand-alone English movies; and of outputting their created videos to tape or disk, e-mail, or the Web.

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having iMovie content.  Each student will create, develop, and output a video production and share it with other students, according to guidelines provided by the instructor.   

Grading:  The final grade is based on the following:

 

Progress Tests and Post-Tests

30%

Document Production

35%

Exams

35%

Total

100%

 

 

 

The grading scale is:  A=90-100%, B+=85-89%, B=80-84%, C+=75-79%, C=70-74%, D=65-69%, F=60-64%

Course Outline:

The English for Using Apple iMovie topics, assignments and tests in this course focus student learning outcomes on reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar and speaking skills through a content-based, integrated approach to language learning.

 

Week

Topics

Assignments and Tests

1

Overview of iMovie:  getting into iMovie and viewing iMovie tutorials

Chapter 1

www.apple,com/ilife/imovie tutorial, “What is iMovie?”

 

 

2

Importing Video:  importing from camcorders, importing from cameras, dragging video from the Finder, and importing footage from older movie projects and/or analog tapes

Chapter 1 (continued...)

3

Conceptualizing an iMovie:  defining an iMovie project

Chapter 2

 

4-5

Building the Movie:  reviewing and selecting from Clips; building the Storyboard; fine tuning the edit; playback; rearranging, copying, and pasting video

Chapter 3

 

 

6

 

Basic Editing Techniques:  using marking, hiding, and showing favorites and rejects; and selecting marked footage; using keywords and the keyword filter; deleting footage; using transitions, themes, and travel maps.

Chapter 4

www.apple,com/ilife/imovie,

 

7

Basic Editing Techniques:  using transitions, themes, and travel maps.

Chapter 5

www.apple,com/ilife/imovie,

 

8

 

Basic Editing Techniques:  using video effects, fast/slow/reverse, green screen, and Picture-in-Picture. 

Bi-Monthly exam

Chapter 6

 

9

Basic Editing Techniques:  using video stabilization, color fixes, video cropping, video rotation, titles, subtitles, and credits.

Chapter 7

 

10

Basic Editing Techniques:  using narration and sound, including background music, sound effects, audio from video, and audio from other sources

Chapter 9

www.apple,com/ilife/imovie, “New Audio Editing”

 

11

Basic Editing Techniques:  importing photo still images, adjusting images, creating still images from footage, and exporting to a still frame.

. 

Chapter 10

www.apple,com/ilife/imovie, “People Finder”

www.apple,com/ilife/iphoto, “What is iPhoto”, “Organize Photos,”

 

12

Advanced Editing Techniques:  using popular editing techniques

Chapter 11

 

13

Screening the Movie On and Synching It To Other Apple Devices:  exporting to iTunes, iPod, iPhone, and other Apple devices.

Chapter 12

www.apple,com/ilife/imovie, “Your World Premiere” tutorial

 

14

Screening the Movie Online:  exporting to Facebook, YouTube, the Web, and QuickTime

 

Chapters 13-15

www.apple,com/ilife/iphoto, “Facebook Enhancements

 

15

Sharing the Movie on DVD (Basics):  overview of DVD basics, using Magic iDVD and themes to create professional looking DVDs, preparing the video, inserting chapter markers, designing the menu screen, creating DVD slideshows, and burning the DVD.

Chapter 16

www.apple,com/ilife/idvd, “Create DVD,” “Burn to Share”

16

Sharing the Movie on DVD (Advanced) :  using the DVD-ROM maker, Apple Scripting iDVD, archiving the project, and professional duplicating in various DVD formats

Bi-Monthly exam. 

Chapters 17-19

www.apple,com/ilife/idvd, “Customize Your DVD”

3/11, 4/2013, 6/2017


 

 

Spanish-American Institute

 

 

 

Course Syllabi

(English For Specific Purposes)

Summer  2017

(revision: winter 2017)

 

 

I acknowledge that I have received a copy of the current course syllabi.

 

 

 

X __________________________________________

 

 

___________ / __________ / __________

 

 

 

A Not-For-Profit, Equal Educational Opportunity English Language School

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