SPANISH-
AMERICAN

INSTITUTE

established  1955

(The Institute Foundation, Inc.)

 

 

 

 

ESL-Plus Course of Study accredited by the Commission on English Language Program Accreditation (CEA)

authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students

 

 

 

 

 

 

school catalog

(with student policies and procedures)

 

 

A Not-For-Profit, Equal Educational Opportunity Language School

240 West 35 Street l Manhattan l New York 10001

Voice: 212.840.7111 l fax: 646.766.0302 l info@sai.nyc l www.sai.nyc

 

wireless internet "Wi-Fi Hotspot" throughout!

 

http://facebook.com/SpanishAmericanInstitute     SKYPE: "StudentClub"

 

Dante V. Ferraro, President

Paul Schiffman, Dean of Students

 

 

 

Frank J. Ferraro, Founding Director (d. 2005)

David Schiffman, Founding Director (d.2016)

Robert Connelly, Dean of Students Emeritus

volume 32 / Summer  2017

June  2017 to August 2018

08/02/2017 9:14:23 PM printing

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.     ABOUT THE INSTITUTE                    5

President's Welcome. 5

Mission Statement 5

History of the Institute. 5

Location and Directions. 5

Description of Facilities. 6

Instructional Equipment 6

Method of Instruction. 6

School Approvals. 6

Accreditation. 6

CEA   6

School and Faculty Affiliations. 7

Legal Control 7

Administration. 7

Student Services Associates. 8

Faculty Student-Services Associates. 8

Faculty Chairps&/ Associate Chairs. 9

Faculty. 9

Advisory Board. 11

Catalog Disclaimer 11

College Credit – Disclaimer Statement 12

Statement of Policy on Discrimination. 12

II.   STUDENT SERVICES                    13

Guidance. 13

Substance Abuse. 13

Transfer Counseling. 13

Library/Learning Resources. 13

Student Lounge. 13

Student ID Card. 13

Bookstore Commissary. 14

Housekeeping. 14

Complaint Procedures. 14

Internet Access. 14

Smoking Policy. 14

Food Consumption Policy. 14

Student Code of Conduct 14

Suspension/Termination For School-Rule Violations. 14

Student/Faculty Campus Security Report 15

Student Housing. 15

Medical Insurance. 15

Importance of Health Insurance  15

“Why Health Insurance Is Important”  16

Where Do You Get Health Insurance?  16

Glossary of Health Insurance  16

Policy on Dissemination of Information. 16

III.  Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants with ESL-Plus           17

Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants with ESL-Plus (1920 hours) 17

F-1 Student Visa SEVIS Record. 17

IV.  COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                    18

200 English Keyboarding For Information Processing (48 hours) 18

201 English for Keyboarding (Basic Course) (120 hours) 18

202English For  Keyboarding (Advanced Course) (120 hours) 19

203 English For Keyboarding (Expert Course) (80 hours) 20

235 English For Introduction to MS Word  (80 hours) 20

300 English For Business Management (120 hours) 21

302 English For Accounting (First Course) (120 hours) 22

303 English For Accounting (Intermediate Course) (120 hours) 23

304 English For Accounting (Advanced I) (60 hours) 24

305 English For Accounting (Advanced II) (60 hours) 25

404 Business Communications (72 hours) 26

500 English Literacy (120 hours) 26

501 English As A Second Language I-VI (120 hours [each level]) 27

502 Business English  (120 hours) 31

503 Advanced Reading & Writing (120 hours) 32

604 English For TASC Preparation (formerly High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation) (240  hours) 33

605 Pre-GED Foundation for GED Preparation (80 hours) 34

610 English For TOEFL Exam Preparation (80 hours) 35

940  English for Introduction to Microsoft Windows  80 Classes. 35

950 English For Using Excel  (80 hours) 36

955 English For Using the Internet (80 hours) 37

965 English For Using Microsoft PowerPoint (80 hours) 38

975 English For Using Adobe PhotoShop (160 hours) 39

990 English For  Introduction to the MAC  (80 hours) 40

995 English For Switching to the Mac  80 hours. 41

1000  English For Using Apple iMovie   80 hours. 42

V.    ADMISSIONS & FINANCIAL AID                   43

Admissions Requirements. 43

Admissions Procedures. 43

Advanced Standing. 43

Transfer Of Hours. 43

Limits of Study for B-2 Nonimmigrants. 44

Student Visa Applications  (Form / I-20) 44

Financial Assistance. 44

Waiver Criteria. 44

Refund Policy. 45

Enrollment Agreement 46

Tuition. 46

VI.  ACADEMIC POLICIES                      47

Office Hours. 47

Student Program Card. 47

Program Changes. 47

Attendance And Tardiness. 47

F-1 Student Visa SEVIS Record. 47

Textbooks And Materials. 47

"Fair Use" Duplication of Copyrighted Classroom Material Guidelines. 47

Homework. 48

Make-Up Assignments / Tests / Academic Dismissal 48

Dress Code. 48

Leave of Absence. 48

Grading Scale. 49

Maintaining Satisfactory Progress. 49

Effect on Satisfactory Academic Progress for Transfer Hours. 50

Effect on Satisfactory Academic Progress of Program Changes. 50

Effect on Satisfactory Academic Progress of Additional Credential 50

Grade Reporting Procedures. 50

Academic Warning and Probation. 51

Assessment Procedures Used To Determine ESL Placement 51

Assessment Procedures To Determine ESL Level-To-Level Progression. 51

Assessment Procedures To Determine Completion Of ESL-Plus. 51

Bi-Monthly Individual Reports of Results. 51

Appeal Procedures. 51

Academic Warning / Probation Appeal Procedure  51

Grade Appeals Procedures  52

Program Evaluation Points. 52

Course Certificates of Completion. 52

Academic Year 52

Academic Calendar 53

Class Hour Schedule. 53

Instructional Hour 53

Course of Study Requirements for F-1 ESL-Plus Student Visa Applicants. 54

Ask For Special "Summer" Upgrade - All Year Long! 54

List of Courses. 55

VII. Student Club Notes  56

·   Free and Low Cost Gyms, Health Clubs and Pools. 56

Manhattan Recreation Centers. 56

Free Flu, Tetanus, Pneumococcal, Hepatitis B Shots. 57

“English through the Arts” ~ Request for Proposals. 58

 

President's Welcome

Welcome to the Spanish-American Institute!  We are proud that since 1955 the Institute has contributed to the educational advancement of over 100,000 students from all over the world.  While the requirements of business have changed greatly over the decades, the Institute remains dedicated to the success of New York's foreign-born students. 

The Institute offers students opportunities to prepare for entry-level employment in a variety of fields including Accounting and Computer Applications.  Computer applications courses include Word Processing, Excel, Access, and PhotoShop among others.  The Institute also offers a wide array of courses in English as a Second Language from beginning through advanced levels.  Graduates are awarded Certificates of Completion for courses and Diplomas or Certificates for programs.  Program graduates of business programs may make use of our employment assistance service.

We offer day and evening courses five days a week from 9:15 a.m. to 9:14 p.m. so that students can take classes that fit their schedules.  As you review this catalog, you will learn even more about the Spanish-American Institute. 

If you would like additional information, please call or visit and tour our facilities. The office at 240 West 35 Street, New York 10001, 212-840-7111, is open for information, registration, and guidance from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Mission Statement

The Spanish-American Institute's mission is to provide effective English language skills training to individuals.

·         Philosophy -

The Institute believes that students are more likely to begin and to successfully complete English language training when English For Specific Purposes courses (i.e. courses in other areas that are premised on language learning while having other content) are combined with ESL-Only courses,. 

 

Objectives -The Institute implements this philosophy through:

·         the establishment and maintenance of an effective faculty,

·         the development of English For Specific Purposes business and computer courses as well as tradioninal ESL only courses., and

·         the integration of a varied English as a Second Language course sequence.

 

The "Plus" courses of the ESL-Plus Course of Study have been reviewed  within the context of English for Special Purposes (ESP) methodology and pedagogy. The curriculum components for the ESP courses have goals, objectives, and student learning outcomes that are premised on language learning while having other content.

 

History of the Institute

The Spanish-American Institute was founded in 1955 by Frank J. Ferraro, President, and David Schiffman, Vice President.  In 1996, it was donated by their successors to The Institute Foundation, Inc., a not-for-profit, equal educational opportunity institution. 

Location and Directions

The Spanish-American Institute is located in the heart of New York's Garment and Fashion Districts.  Just down the block from Macy’s, Madison Square Garden and Penn Station.  34th Street has an Express Stop on nearly every subway line!

By Subway.  The A, B, CC, D, E, F, SS, N, RR, 1, 2, 3, and 7 subway lines have stops at nearby.  The 4, 5, and 6 East Side trains connect through Times Square from Grand Central Terminal by the SS "Shuttle".

Local Bus Service.  Numerous City buses stop at Herald Square.
Express Bus.  Many areas outside Manhattan are served by private and City express buses, all of which make stops at or near Penn Station and the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

From New Jersey.  The Institute is a short walk from the Port Authority Bus Terminal which serves neighboring New Jersey towns.

By Car.  While parking is available at area garages and some students "car-pool" with family and friends, mass transit offers such abundant, varied and inexpensive transportation that few choose to drive.

Description of Facilities

The Institute moved to its present custom-designed, fully air-conditioned facility on the second floor at 240 West 35 Street, Manhattan in 2016, after 48 years at 215 West 43 Street.  The administrative offices, guidance offices, bookstore, student lounge, computer room, and classrooms are easily accessible to each other.  The Institute is wheelchair accessible.  Every effort will be accommodate people with special needs.  For additional information, please contact the Dean of Students at (212) 840-7111.

Instructional Equipment

Computer, keyboarding, accounting, Internet, and TOEFL students have access to modern computer equipment, software, and printers.  English language classes have weekly access to mobile TV/DVD and daily access to CD players for audiovisual language learning and reinforcement. 

Method of Instruction

The Institute is a clock-hour, continuous enrollment institution.  All courses and programs are designed so that students can enroll in any class at any time during the year and progress systematically through each class.  Students are tested regularly and must pass required tests to maintain good academic standing.

New students are admitted to classes on the second Monday of each month.  When the second Monday is a school holiday, new students are admitted on Tuesday.  Exceptions may be made upon consultation with the Dean of Admissions.

School Approvals

The Spanish-American Institute is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant, alien students. Prospective students and their parents may review school accreditation documents by contacting the President for an appointment at 212-840-7111.

Accreditation

CEA

Commission on English Language Program Accreditation

The Commission on English Language Program Accreditation (CEA) was founded in 1999 by English language professionals as a specialized accrediting agency.  The purpose was to provide a means for improving the quality of English language teaching and administration through accepted standards. CEA conducts accreditation reviews in the U.S. and internationally.

In September 2003, CEA was recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education as a national accrediting agency for English language programs and institutions. This recognition gave CEA the distinction of being the only specialized accrediting agency for English language programs and institutions in the U.S. In December 2005, the Commission expanded its mission to include the accreditation of English language programs and schools outside the U.S.

The ESL-Plus Course of Study at the Spanish-American Institute was accredited by CEA in December 2012.

You can learn more about CEA on their website: http://cea-accredit.org/about-cea  .  There you will also find the standards for CEA accreditation:  http://cea-accredit.org/about-cea/standards  and a CEA complaint form.:  http://cea-accredit.org/about-cea/complaints

School and Faculty Affiliations

Institute administration, or faculty maintain affiliations with many community, civic, and educational organizations including:

New York State Business Teachers Association

Teachers of English as a Second Language Association (TESOL)

The Time Square Business Improvement District

Legal Control

The Institute Foundation, Inc., a not‑for‑profit New York corporation established in 1995, owns the Spanish-American Institute.  Its officers are Dante V. Ferraro, President/Treasurer; Paul Schiffman, Vice President; and Robert Connelly, Secretary.

Administration

Dante V. Ferraro, President/PDSO

BA, Fordham

dvf@sai.nyc

Paul C. Schiffman, Dean of Students/DSO

BS Ed., Hofstra University

paul@sai.nyc

CSI's Caryn Davis has been recognized by The New York Times as an outstanding ESOL professional.

Caryn T. Davis, Dean of Academic Affairs,

MA, TESOL, New School; BA, Hunter College

caryn.davis@sai.nyc

Thomas S. Schwenke, Dean of Administrative Services/DSO

MA, Fordham University

tom@sai.nyc

Frank J. Ferraro, Founding Director (d.2005)

 MA, New York University

David Schiffman, Founding Director (d. 2016)

MA, New York University

Robert Connelly, Dean of Students Emeritus

BA, Farleigh Dickinson University

Student Services Associates

Maria Florencia Aizpun

florencia@sai.nyc

Student Services Associate

Ana Cachafeiro Zazo

anacacha@sai.nyc

Student Services Associate

Leonardo Ferradino

leonardo@sai.nyc

Student Services Associate

Ildelisa Lopez

ildelisa@sai.nyc

Student Services Associate/DSO

Ana Desiree Maldonado

desiree@sai.nyc

Student Services Assosiate

2017-2020

Artist-in-Residence

 

 

Faculty Student-Services Associates

 

 

Degree/Institution Awarding Degree

Teaching Specialization

Rasha Abdelrasol

rasha@sai.nyc

BA, University of Alexandria

Student Support Services

Accounting

Anna Agarkova

anna@sai.nyc

BA/MA, South Urals State University, Russia

Faculty Student-Services Associate

Dr. Leonila Dolina

 

Ph.D., University of Santo Tomas

MA, Divine Word University

BS, St. Paul’s College

Faculty Student-Services Associate

Dr. Dilyara Engulatova

Ph.D., Institute of Philosophy and Law of the Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan

BBA in Accounting, Tashkent Institute of Railway Engineering

Faculty Student-Services Associate

 

Christian Gallardo

christian@sai2000.org

 

BS, University of Valparaiso

Faculty Student-Services Associate

 

Mary Helen Gomez

maryhelen@sai.nyc

 

BBA, Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre Y Maestra

Faculty Student-Services Associate

Lyudmila Klavsen

lyudmil@sai2000.org

MS, Izhevsk Institute of Mechanical Engineering

Faculty Student-Services Associate

 

Maria A. Machado

maria@sai2000.org

BA, UNITAU, Taubaté University

Faculty Student-Services Associate

 

Karina Rodriguez

karina@sai2000.org

BS, Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre Y Maestra

Faculty Student-Services Associate

 

Ivelisse Rymer

ivelisse@sai2000.org

BS, Univ. Autonoma Santo Domingo

Faculty Student-Services Associate/DSO

Irina Zatulovski

irina@sai.nyc

BS, Tashkent Institute of Highway Engineering

Faculty Student-Services Associate

Faculty Chairps&/ Associate Chairs

 

 

Degree/Institution Awarding Degree

Department

Andrey Armyakov

MA, Friedrich-Schiller University at Jena, Germany

English Associate Chair

Freddie Ann Bush

freddieann@sai.nyc

 

MS, Hunter College

BS, North Carolina A&T

Business Chair

Ilya Gogin

ilya@sai.nyc

BA, MA Linguistics and Education

Kostroma State University

English Associate Chair

Enrique Nibeyro

enrique@sai2000.org

MS, Argentine Catholic Pontifical University

BS, Argentine Catholic Pontifical University

Computer Studies Chair

Dr. Nori Panganiban

nori@sai.nyc

EdD, Centro Escolar University

MA, National Teachers College

BS, Golden Gate College

English Chair

Faculty

Photo-

Name-

Degree/Institution Awarding Degree

Teaching Specialization

Galyna Andryushchenko

BS, Vinnitsa State Pedagogical Institute

English as a Second Language

Jenny Arbai

jenny@sai.nyc

 

BS, Triskati School of Management

English as a Second Language

Andrey Armyakov

MA, Friedrich-Schiller University at Jena, Germany

English as a Second Language

Naomi Avraham

naomi@sai.nyc

MA, Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University

BS, Lesley University

English as a Second Language

Evdokia Azoidou

BA, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

English as a Second Language

Olesya Brazhnikova

olesya@sai.nyc

BS, Pyatigorsk State Linguistic University

English as a Second Language

Freddie Ann Bush

MS, Hunter College

BS, North Carolina A&T

English as a Second Language

Eligio Castillo

BA, La Consolacion College

English as a Second Language

Vedat Cingozler

vedat@sai.nyc

TESOL Certificate, Hunter College

BA, International Relations, Cag University, Turkey

English as a Second Language

Malabi Deb

malabi@sai.nyc

BA, Hunter College of the City University of New York

English as a Second Language

Ana M. Diaz

BS, Univ. Autonoma Santo Domingo

Computer Applications, Business Education, English as a Second Language

Gladys Diaz

BS, Univ. Autonoma Santo Domingo

English as a Second Language

Iliyana Dimitrova

iliyana@sai.nyc

 

BEd., University of Velikotarnova, Bulgaria

English as a Second Language

Leonila Loreen Dolina Ruck

loreen@sai.nyc

BSN, United Medical Center College of Nursing

English as a Second Language

Dr. Dilyara Engulatova

Ph.D., Institute of Philosophy and Law of the Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan

MA, Tashkent State Institute of Transportation

BBA in Accounting, Tashkent Institute of Railway Engineering

"English through the Arts"

Coordinator

Accounting

Christian Gallardo

christian@sai2000.org

BS, University of Valparaiso

English as a Second Language

Marketing & Management

General Academic

Ilya Gogin

ilya@sai.nyc

BA, MA Linguistics and Education

Kostroma State University

English as a Second Language

Angie Gomez

angie@sai2000.org

BBA, Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre Y Maestra

Computer Applications

Diana Kyrychuk

diana@sai.nyc

BA, Kyiv National Linguistic University, Ukraine

English as a Second Language

Semen Mere-Mere

semen@sai.nyc

BA, Kemerovo State University

English as a Second Language

Kristina Mitrovic

kristina@sai.nyc

BA, University Jurja Dobrila In Pula, Republic of Croatia

English as a Second Language

Enrique Nibeyro

enrique@sai2000.org

BS, Argentine Catholic Pontifical University

Computer Applications

Dr. Nori Panganiban

nori@sai.nyc

 

EdD, Centro Escolar University

MA, National Teachers College

BS, Golden Gate College

Business Education, English as a Second Language

Ivelisse Rymer

ivelisse@sai2000.org

BS, Univ. Autonoma Santo Domingo

Accounting

Veronica Sanchez

veronica@sai.nyc

BS, Autonomous University of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

English as a Second Language

Suhrob Ulmasov

BS, Finance, Tajik National University, Tajikistan

Computer Applications

Advisory Board

Advisory Board members represent education, community, and business.  They advise the Institute on community needs and business trends considered in the design and implementation of our programs.  This input keeps the Institute "in touch" with new developments.  The Advisory Board is part of our continuing effort to improve and maintain the quality of the training for its students.  Advisory Boards members for 2016-2017 are: 

Steven Corwin, Corwin Accounting Services

Dr. Barbara Ferraro, Superintendent, Rye Neck Schools

Rob Goldie, President, Starr Printing

Jeffrey Gural, President, Newmark & Company Real Estate

Octavio Rocha, Account Executive, Hispanicmark Advertising

Donald Ross, Esquire, Malkin and Ross

Kenneth Zimmerman, Chateaux Software Development Corp.

Catalog Disclaimer

The student should be aware that some information in the catalog may change. It is recommended that students considering enrollment check with the school director to determine if there is any change from the information provided in the catalog. In addition, a catalog will contain information on the school’s teaching personnel and

courses/curricula offered. Please be advised that it is possible that courses/curricula listed in the school’s catalog may have changed. It is again recommended that the student check with the school director to determine if there are any changes in the courses/curricula offered or the teaching personnel listed in the catalog.

College Credit – Disclaimer Statement

The Institute offers curricula measured in clock hours, not credit hours. Certificates of completion are issued to students who meet clock hour requirements.  Institutions of higher education do not offer transfer credits for courses taken at the Institute.

Statement of Policy on Discrimination

The Spanish-American Institute does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, race, gender, or sexual orientation in its employment practices or in the educational programs and activities it operates.  Inquiries concerning this policy of equal opportunity and affirmative action should be referred to the Institute’s Affirmative Action Officer, Dante V. Ferraro, 240 West 35 Street, Manhattan, NY 10001, 212-840-7111 (ext. 2800), fax: 646.766.0302, e‑mail: dvf@sai.nyc, www.sai.nyc.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          II.      STUDENT SERVICES

Guidance

The Institute maintains an "open door" policy regarding the personal and academic guidance of its students.  Students seeking advice on personal or academic matters have access to both administration and faculty.  The Administration will formally meet with students when deemed necessary to discuss academic, attendance, or school rules and policies issues.

Substance Abuse

Institute policies prohibit substance abuse among all members of the school community.  Faculty and administration encourage students to recognize the dangers of substance abuse and to stay free of abuse. Professional information and counseling sources are available in the Institute's office and resource centers. 

Transfer Counseling

The Institute supports the principle of transfer and the award of credit for previous academic work.  School personnel are ready to assist graduates seeking admission to other institutions in requesting credit for courses or programs completed at the Institute.

Students seeking transfer credit to other institutions and programs should keep in mind that each institution is responsible for determining its own policies and practices with regard to transfer and award of credit.  There are at least three considerations that may affect transfer:

·         Educational quality of the institution from which the student transfers

·         Comparability of the nature, content, and level of previous academic work to that offered by the receiving institution.

·         Appropriateness and applicability of previous academic work to the programs offered by the receiving institution in light of the student's educational goals.

Library/Learning Resources

Students and faculty have access to academic resource materials in several ways: 

·         The Spanish-American Institute Library houses over 450 print volumes, including reference materials.

·         The Bookstore provides faculty with audio-visual equipment and language laboratory tapes for classroom use.

·         The Student Lounge contains magazines and periodicals.    

·         Computer workstations provide Internet access. 

Student Lounge

The Student Lounge is available during school hours to students and faculty who wish to study or "snack" before or after class.  Students are not permitted in the Student Lounge during those hours when they are scheduled for classes.  The Lounge contains current issues of newspapers and magazines, discount ticket vouchers to current Broadway shows and amusement parks  The Student Club “Book Swap” promotes the exchange of used books among students, faculty and friends of the Institute.  The Student Club “Book Exchange” provides a place for student to list old textbooks “Wanted to Buy” of “Wanted to Sell”.

Student ID Card 

Each student is issued a Student ID Card the first day of class.  Students should carry this card with them at all times.  Persons unable to identify themselves as students of the Institute may be asked to leave the school.  Many social and cultural institutions that offer special student discounts accept the Institute's student ID card. 

Bookstore Commissary

The Institute's Bookstore maintains a supply of textbooks, workbooks, materials and supplies required for course assignments.  Students may also purchase light snacks in the Bookstore.  The Bookstore is maintained for the convenience of the student body.  While students are required to have the necessary texts, materials, etc., before starting classes, they may obtain them from outside sources, if they so desire.

Housekeeping

Students and Instructors are responsible for cooperating in:

·         maintaining a professional and orderly atmosphere in the classroom,

·         insuring that the necessary supplies and equipment are available by requesting them of the administration and staff, and

·         following Institute procedures for reporting equipment in need of repair and for ordering teaching supplies through a Dean or the President..

Complaint Procedures

Students and all employees (including administrative staff) who have concerns, dissatisfactions, or complaints are encouraged to bring them to the Institute's attention as promptly as possible.  Problems involving classroom matters should first be discussed directly with the faculty member involved.  Questions about administrative policies or non-academic matters should be discussed with a Faculty Student-Services Associate.

Concerns unresolved with a Faculty Student-Services Associate may be discussed with the Dean of Students.  Dissatisfactions unresolved with the Dean of Students should be presented to the President.

Remaining issues may be submitted in writing to the Board of Directors.  The submission should describe the problem in detail, include any available documentation, and be signed by the student or employee.  The Board will make appropriate inquiries and recommend a resolution within thirty (30) days of receiving the written concern and will notify the student or employee of those findings.

At no time shall a final determination be made by a person or persons directly involved in the complaint itself.  Students and employees are assured that no adverse action will be taken against anyone expressing a concern through this mechanism.

Internet Access

Classroom and office facilities are wired for FIOS Internet access.  The entire school facility provides wireless access to the Internet. 

Smoking Policy

In accordance with New York City Law, smoking is not permitted in the Institute or in any indoor public building areas.

Food Consumption Policy

Food and beverage consumption is discouraged in classrooms.  The Student Lounge/Special Events Center are available for those who wish to bring lunch or to snack between classes.

Student Code of Conduct

Students are expected to conduct themselves properly in classes and about the school area.  Movement between classes should be orderly.  Students must report promptly to classes when the bell rings.  There should be mutual respect among students and teachers at all times.

Suspension/Termination For School-Rule Violations

A student's failure to behave properly may result in expulsion after a hearing before appropriate administrative personnel.  Students dismissed due to improper conduct, poor attendance, failing progress, or tuition arrears are not relieved of financial obligations as specified in the Enrollment Agreement.  Such dismissal does not affect the computation of the applicable refund calculation.

Student/Faculty Campus Security Report

Campus Security Policies.  All areas of the school are under the constant supervision of the school President and Deans, administrative personnel, and faculty members.  Each is familiar with the procedures to follow in responding to emergencies and crime situations.  Every effort is made to minimize the risk of crime.

Procedure for Reporting Emergencies and Crimes.  In the event of an emergency or crime, students should contact the nearest faculty member or administrative support person and/or the Institute President's office.

 

Procedure for Responding to Reports of Emergencies & Crimes.  All faculty and staff members will notify the office immediately when appraised of such situations.  The President or his designee will notify the police, medical personnel, or other appropriate agencies.  In the event of an emergency or crime requires immediate action, all faculty and administrative personnel will respond by calling one or more of the following numbers:

Police, Fire, and Medical Emergencies

911

 

 

Roosevelt Hospital

1000 Tenth Avenue @ West 57 Street
New York, NY 10019

212.523.4000

In the event of fire, follow the exit procedures listed for fires on posted signs.  Fire extinguishers are located throughout the school.  All school personnel are familiar with fire and exit procedures.

Policy Regarding Alcohol and Drug-Related Violations.  In accordance with Federal regulations stipulated by the Drug Free Act of 1988, the drug and alcohol policy of the Spanish-American Institute is as follows:

·         The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of alcohol, narcotics, or illicit drugs, or the consumption of alcohol by persons under the State legal age is prohibited on Institute premises. 

·         Any student or employee discovered to be violating these rules is subject to suspension and/or dismissal.  Such action will be taken independently of any criminal action that may arise from a violation of civil law governing these areas.

·         Reinstatement of suspended students or employees will not occur until the Institute can ascertain by professional documentation that the student or employee has undergone counseling and treatment and is free from any drug or alcohol addiction. 

Information Programs Available.

If you or someone you know needs help with drug and/or alcohol or if you would like information, please contact the school office or one of the following agencies:

·         Narcotics Anonymous Regional Helpline ~ 212-929-6262

·         Alcoholics Anonymous Intergroup Hotline ~ 212-647-1680

Student Housing

Housing is an intensely personal decision.  Make your selection with care.  Use good common sense and sound consumer practices when making your housing choices:

·         verify all information before you make reservations;

·         try to obtain references through friends and family;

·         never pay in cash - - - use a credit card or check.

·         be sure to get a receipt

·         reserve for a short, trial period before committing for a long-term housing arrangement directly

The Institute does not conduct "home stay" operations.  It does not provide, recommend or contract with others for student housing services.  It does not collect fees for housing services.

 Medical Insurance

While the Institute does not require students to obtain medical care insurance or recommend a specific plan,  it is important for students to realize that medical care expenses can jeopardize a student's financial status and ability to maintain full-time student status in good standing.

Importance of Health Insurance

Having health insurance is also important because coverage helps people get timely medical care and improves their lives and health.  Without health insurance people:

·          receive less medical care and less timely care.  (Overall, uninsured people get about half as much care as the privately insured—even taking into account free care received from providers).

·          have worse health outcomes.  (Uninsured people are sicker and more apt to die prematurely than their insured counterparts.  Conversely, having health coverage is associated with better health-related outcomes).

The following article provides more detailed information on why it is important to consider getting a health insurance.

“Why Health Insurance Is Important”

  http://www.urban.org/uploadedPDF/411569_importance_of_insurance.pdf

Where Do You Get Health Insurance?

There are many insurance companies that offer health insurance for international students studying in the United States.  Be careful when selecting an insurer.  The following organization indicates on its website that it is recognized by the American Association of Intensive English Programs (AAIEP) and NAFSA: Association of International Educators.  International Student Insurance  http://www.internationalstudentinsurance.com/student-health-insurance/

Glossary of Health Insurance

It is important to understand the terminology used when discussing health insurance. The following link provides a glossary of health insurance terminology:  http://www.naic.org/documents/index_health_reform_glossary.pdf

Policy on Dissemination of Information

The Institute will use, as appropriate,  all reasonable means to communicate policies, procedures, academic status, and updates to the public, students, staff and administration.  This includes email, SMS text messaging, regular post office mail, memos, meetings, school website, social media, bulletin boards and shared network drives.

 

Students, faculty, staff and administrators for their part will assist in this effort by making every reasonable effort to keep the Institute updated on changes to their e-mail addresses, home addresses, and cell phone and land-line phone numbers.

                                  III.      Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants with ESL-Plus

Course of Study Requirements for F-1 Student Visa Applicants with ESL-Plus (1920 hours)

In order to pursue a full-time ESL-Plus course of study eligible for F-1 student visa application, students must:

Ø    attend four hours per day, five days per week

Ø    maintain satisfactory academic progress

Ø    have English language skills acquisition as their primary educational objective

Ø    consult with a Faculty Student-Services Associate to select an appropriate sequence of courses from among those ESL-only and ESL-plus courses listed in the following “Course Description” section.

F-1 Student Visa SEVIS Record

The Institute's designated school official terminate the SEVIS (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System) record of any F-1 student visa student who does not comply with the SEVP (Student and Exchange Visitor Program) full course of study requirement or where a pattern of non-attendance is evident.

 

Students may complete less than (or more  than) course hours of work in listed individual course hours if teachers recommend advancement upon completion of terminal objectives prior to (or after) completion of the individual course hours.  Slower students must complete 65% of the course hour terminal objectives to maintain satisfactory academic progress.  Therefore, the number of hours spent in each course will vary according to course placement at registration and individual achievement of terminal course objectives.

 

* Students begin studies at the level corresponding to their current language abilities as determined by a placement test and remain in the assigned level for the number of hours indicated unless the instructor recommends a higher level sooner or later.  Teacher recommendations are based on student attainment of the course terminal objectives in less than (or more than) the normal number of hours.

 

TUITION:  See List of Courses on page 55.       Certificate: See List of Courses on page 55.

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                               IV.      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

200 English Keyboarding For Information Processing (48 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  English Level V or by individual placement through advisement

DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students develop English language skills related to keyboarding and information processing.  Students acquire language related to keyboarding while exploring basic keyboarding and information processing.  Students also utilize language skills to complete basic computer application tasks.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will develop student’s :

·        keyboarding vocabulary and

·        identification of keyboarding spelling and punctuation errors

OBJECTIVES: 

Students will be able to: 

·         demonstrate understanding of English keyboarding terms;

·         identify and  modify English spelling, punctuation, and other language errors in a document

·         type a short timed document using grammatically correct English.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

·        identify and utilize keyboarding terms with 80% accuracy.

·        read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;

·        recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors; and

·         compose short timed-writings with 80% accuracy

TUITION:  $192          Certificate:  Keyboarding for Information Processing

201 English for Keyboarding (Basic Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  English Level V or by individual placement through advisement

DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students develop English language skills related to keyboarding and information processing.  Students acquire language related to keyboarding while exploring keyboarding and information processing.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will reinforce students’:

·        ability to comprehend and use English vocabulary related to keyboarding and

·         keyboarding techniques. 

OBJECTIVES:

  Students will be able to:

·        read, comprehend, and edit English language  errors in letters and documents

·        transfer and type letters, reports, tables, memos and business documents from handwritten text

·         type 25 WPM with less than 5 errors in 5 minutes.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

·         to read and understand English letter combinations and words, word combinations, sentences, and passages;

·         to recognize and correct spelling, punctuation, and other English language errors; 

·         to recognize directions in English when practicing keyboarding exercises;

·         to distinguish concepts and implementation;

·         to identify and correct English language errors in producing documents;  

·         to produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from hand-written and from printed text in English with 80% accuracy;

·         to develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and

·         to build basic speed and accuracy skills (to 25 wpm keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes). 

TUITION:  $480    Certificate:  Keyboarding (Basic Course)

202English For  Keyboarding (Advanced Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Keyboarding 201 or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students further develop English language skills related to keyboarding and information processing.  Students acquire structural and functional language  related to keyboarding while business correspondence, reports, tabulations, forms from unarranged and rough-draft hand-written and print copy sources in English.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will:

·        reinforce students’ receptive ability to interpret  advanced keyboarding exercises

·        develop students’ interpretation and application of business language and situations

OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

·        demonstrate correct vocabulary and grammar usage when producing a document with 80% accuracy

·        recognize keyboarding instructions

·        examine  information from multiple sources to determine proper document format.

·        interpret and type documents from printed English.

·         type 25 wpm with no more that 5 errors in 5 minutes

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

·         comprehend and utilize English word division and composite words;

·         interpret directions in English when practicing advanced keyboarding exercises;

·         interpret and apply English language descriptions of business situations in the production of documents;

·         synthesize information from various English language sources that will determine the format of document production;   

·         produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from hand-written and from printed text in English, identifying and correcting language errors;

·         develop touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and

·         build basic speed and accuracy skills to 25 wpm while keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes. 

TUITION:  $480     Certificate:  Keyboarding (Advanced Course)

203 English For Keyboarding (Expert Course) (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Keyboarding 202 or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  :  

In this “English Through Keyboarding” course students further develop English language skills related to keyboarding; focusing on speed and accuracy skills through production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft hand-written and print copy sources in English.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will reinforce students’:

·        ability to apply English reading, speaking and writing skills to determine format and produce business documents

·         keyboarding skills, including touch control, techniques, and speed

OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

·        demonstrate comprehension of keyboarding directions and apply to various business situations

·        differentiate between various business  situations and modify document formats, including letters, reports, memos and  tables.

·        locate English grammatical, spelling and composition errors

·         type 45 wpm with less than 5 errors in 5 minutes

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

·         comprehend and apply directions in English when practicing advanced keyboarding exercises within  integrated business situations experiences requiring English language reading, discussion, and writing skills;

·         distinguish English language descriptions of complex business situations that will determine the production of documents;

·         synthesize information from various English language sources that will determine the format of document production;    

·         produce within situated experiences various kinds of letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from English language text, identifying and correcting language errors;

·         develop advanced touch control of the keyboard and proper keyboarding techniques; and

·         build basic speed and accuracy skills (to 45 wpm, keyboarding English text with no more than five errors in five minutes). 

TUITION:  $320     Certificate:  Keyboarding (Expert Course)

235 English For Introduction to MS Word  (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

Textbook: :  Microsoft Office 2008 for the Macintosh:  Visual QuickStart Guide by Steve Schwartz.  Peachpit Press, 2008.  ISBN 0-321-53400-X. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  this course builds word processing speed and accuracy through practice in the production of various kinds of business correspondence, of reports, of tabulations, and of forms from unarranged and rough-draft copy sources. 

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students will be able to:

·         understand, discuss and describe word processing situations;

·         discuss text describing business situations requiring word processing solutions;

·         follow directions when practicing word processing exercises;

·         ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;

·         proofread documents and make necessary corrections;

·         produce letters, reports, memos, tables, and other personal-business and business documents from copy, identifying and correcting errors;

·         apply basic word processing using Word, including entering, formatting, creating tables, using styles and templates, mail merging, and using graphics

TUITION:  $320     Certificate: Introduction to Microsoft Word for Windows

300 English For Business Management (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE: English Level V or by individual placement through advisement

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through Business Management” course students develop English language skills and acquire business terminology and common structures used in business settings. Through reading, discussion, and case study analysis, students develop an understanding of  English language usage:

·       in small business planning, 

·       marketing and operational strategy development,

·       legal and financial issues, and

·       day-to-day supervision and control procedures. 

(This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This English For Specific Purposes course will develop the student’s:

·        knowledge of English business management key terms

·        ability to assess visual material and

·         ability to  analyse, discuss and write a small business plan in English

OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

·        describe key small English business management terms

·        use English to examine and interpret various visual materials including, graphs and charts

·        analyze, discuss and write about small business problems in English and

·         create a small business plan in English

STUDENT LEARNING OURCOMES: 

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

·         identify key English terms related to small business management;

·         analyze and interpret, in English, graphs, charts, and other visual material;

·         to read, discuss, and write in English about cases illustrating typical small business situations or problems; and

·         to develop an individual small business plan in English.  

TUITION:  $480   Certificate:  Business Management

302 English For Accounting (First Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  English Level V or by individual placement through advisement

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with basic accounting functions. This course sequence introduces students to the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will introduce students to:

·        the purposes and principles of accounting

·        fundamental accounting procedures

·         accounting principles viewed from different business types

OBJECTIVES: 

Students will be able to:

·        read and explain accounting descriptions and business language.

·        clearly pronounce numbers and numerical functions

·        interpret and use visual materials including charts and graphs

·        speak, read, and write about various accounting situations

·        breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions

·        apply accounting principles to merchandising inventories and sales costs

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

·        read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business; 

·        develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions; 

·        interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials; 

·        speak and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions; 

·        read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions; 

·        interpret orally and in writing how businesses communicate with financial statements; and

·         apply accounting principles and procedures to analyzing and recording transactions, to accrual accounting and financial statement, to completing the accounting cycle, to accounting for merchandising activities and to merchandise inventories and sales costs.    

TUITION:   $480    Certificate:  Accounting (First Course)

303 English For Accounting (Intermediate Course) (120 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Accounting 302 or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with intermediate accounting functions. This second course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will reinforce students’ knowledge of

·        the purposes and principles of accounting

·        fundamental accounting procedures

·        accounting principles viewed from different business types

OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

·        interpret written accounting and general business language

·        interpret and use visual materials including charts and graphs

·        speak, read, and write about various accounting situations

·        breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions

·        explain the concept and form of accounting information systems

·        apply accounting principles to cash and internal control; to receivables and short-term investments; to plant assets, natural resources, and intangibles; to current liabilities; and to partnerships.  

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

                      to read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business; 

                      to interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials; 

                      to talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions; 

                      to read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions; 

                      to interpret how businesses communicate with financial statements

                      to understand the concept and forms of accounting information systems; and 

                      to apply accounting principles and procedures to cash and internal control; to receivables and short-term investments; to plant assets, natural resources, and intangibles; to current liabilities; and to partnerships.  

TUITION:  $480     Certificate:  Accounting (Intermediate Course)

304 English For Accounting (Advanced I) (60 hours)

PREREQUISITE: Accounting 303 or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with advanced accounting functions. This third course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will expand students’ knowledge of:

·        purposes and principles of accounting

·        fundamental accounting procedures

·         analysis and application of various accounting concepts and procedures

OBJECTIVES:

 Students will be able to:

·        read and explain accounting descriptions and business language.

·        clearly pronounce numbers and numerical functions

·        interpret and use visual materials including charts and graphs

·        speak, read, and write about various accounting situations

·        breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions

·        apply accounting principles to equity transactions and corporate accounting, term liabilities, long-term investments, reporting and analyzing cash flows, analysis of financial statements, and managerial accounting and job order cost accounting concepts and principles. 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

          read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business; 

          develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions; 

          interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials; 

          talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions; 

          read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions; 

          interpret how business communicates with financial statements

          apply accounting principles and procedures to equity transactions and corporate accounting, term liabilities, long-term investments, reporting and analyzing cash flows, analysis of financial statements, and managerial accounting and job order cost accounting concepts and principles. 

TUITION:  $240      Certificate:  Accounting (Advanced I)

305 English For Accounting (Advanced II) (60 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  Accounting 304 or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through Accounting” course students develop English language skills to be successful with basic accounting functions. This fourth course in an accounting sequence expands students' knowledge about the purposes and principles of accounting and the practice of fundamental accounting procedures. Students analyze and apply accounting concepts and procedures to real-life situations drawn from various types of businesses.  (This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.)

GOALS:

This course will reinforce students’ knowledge of:

·        purposes and principles of accounting

·        fundamental accounting procedures

·         analysis and application of various accounting concepts and procedures

OBJECTIVES: 

Students will be able to:

·        interpret written English  accounting and general business language

·        interpret and use English visual materials including charts and graphs

·        speak, read, and write in English about various accounting situations

·        breakdown financial statements and analyze transactions in English

·        explain in English the concept and form of accounting information systems

·        apply accounting principles and procedures to process cost accounting, cost allocation and performance measurement, cost-volume-profit analysis, master budgets and planning, flexible budgets and standard costs, and capital budgeting. 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

          to read and better understand written English language descriptions of accounting, the language of business; 

          to develop oral fluency with numbers and numerical functions; 

          to interpret charts, graphs, and other visual materials; 

          to talk and to write in English about situations and problems requiring accounting activities or solutions; 

          to read for detail in the context of accounting problems and directions; 

          to explain orally and in writing how businesses communicate with financial statements

          to apply accounting principles and procedures to process cost accounting, cost allocation and performance measurement, cost-volume-profit analysis, master budgets and planning, flexible budgets and standard costs, and capital budgeting. 

TUITION:  $240    Certificate:  Accounting (Advanced II)

404 Business Communications (72 hours)

PREREQUISITE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  this course emphasizes the application of correct grammar and punctuation to letters, memos, reports, and other forms of personal and business communication.  

OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the course, students will be able to:

·         recognize and solve common sentence problems;

·         understand how context affects meaning and to correct grammar and other writing choices;

·         recognize and use correct grammar in context with an emphasis upon grammar and usage issues for ESL writers;

·         understand and use correct punctuation, mechanics, and spelling in business writing; and

·         use language skills to develop letters, memos, and other common forms of personal-business and business communication.  

TUITION:  $288   Certificate:  Business Communications

500 English Literacy (120 hours)

Prerequisite(s):  None.

Course Description:  A basic introduction to English for students who have had little or no prior school experience in English.

Course Goals:  To develop students’ basic ability to comprehend and respond appropriately to simplified spoken English and to produce basic spoken English in social situations; to develop students’ basic ability to comprehend and analyze simplistic texts in English; to develop students’ ability to recognize word order and simple sentence structure.

Course Objectives: . Students will learn fundamental literacy skills and basic communicative competence in English needed to successfully continue ESL instruction and/or to participate successfully in the workplace and community.  By the end of the course, students should have developed basic receptive skills for listening and reading American English. 

Student Learning Outcomes: .   Students will be able to: .  

o       Recognize frequently used words, phrases and questions in familiar contexts.

o       Respond appropriately to simple questions regarding personal information and present activities.

o       State personal information; and ask for personal information.

o       Use personal information to complete simple forms.

o       Write basic personal information.

o       Write simple sentences using personal information.

o       Recognize personal information in print.

Instructional Methods.  

Daily classes encourage application of newly-learned skills to everyday situations through conversation, reading, and writing.  Language elements are introduced, used, and reused in different written, oral, and aural situations within contexts drawn from daily life.  Instruction will be supplemented with companion ESL video and music recordings keyed to textbook units.   

Learning Activities:  role-plays, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, controlled conversation practice, creative conversation practice, model and repeat, peer review, journals.

Textbook: Longman ESL Literacy, Yvonne Wong Nishio, Pearson Longman, 2006 or comparable text. 

TUITION:   $480    Certificate:  English Literacy

501 English As A Second Language I-VI (120 hours [each level])

501.1 English as a Second Language (Level I)

Prerequisite(s):  Placement test or ESL 500. 

Course Description:  Prepares students to understand simple spoken phrases and respond to basic personal information questions.

Course Goal:  To develop students’ ability to comprehend and respond to spoken English on familiar topics, such as self, school, family, work and everyday activities; to develop students’ ability to comprehend and appropriately use basic grammatical structures in both written and spoken English; to develop students’ ability to identify key ideas in basic texts relating to everyday topics; and to develop students’ ability to construct simple and compound sentences on a familiar topic or idea.

Course Objectives:  Students will listen, speak, read and write English at a beginning level.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will be able to:

o       State simple descriptions of people, places, routines, likes and dislikes.

o       Respond appropriately to simple questions regarding personal information, present activities, past activities and home, family, work and hobbies.

o       Recognize and identify key ideas in a short passage relating to self, home, family, work, and hobbies.

o       Write simple sentences and compound sentences relating to self, home, family, work, hobbies and present and past activities.

Instructional Methods: Daily classes encourage application of newly-learned skills to everyday situations through conversation, reading, and writing.  Language elements are introduced, used, and reused in different written, oral, and aural situations within contexts drawn from daily life.  Instruction will be supplemented with companion ESL video and music recordings keyed to textbook units.   

Learning Activities: lecture listening, role-plays, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, controlled conversation practice, creative conversation practice, model and repeat, peer review, journals, paragraph modeling.

Textbook: WorldView 1 (or comparable text), Pearson Education, 2002. 

501.2 English as a Second Language Level II)

Prerequisite(s):  Placement Test or ESL I.

Course Description:  Prepares students to communicate using routine statements related to personal needs, desires, and feelings in familiar social contexts.

Course Goals:  To improve students’ ability to comprehend and respond appropriately to high-beginning spoken English and to improve students’ ability to use spoken English in real world situations; to improve students’ ability to use grammatical structures necessary for expressing the present, the future and the past time; to develop students’ ability to comprehend and analyze high beginning texts. 

Course Objectives:  Students will understand, speak, read and write at a basic or high beginning level.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will be able to:

o       Express simple statements and questions in the present, past and future time frame related to basic needs and common activities, using previously learned phrases. 

o        Communicate needs and activities using appropriate time frame and vocabulary.

o       Employ simple clarification requests to determine meaning of question or statement.

o       Recognize words that signal differences between present, past and future.

o       Respond appropriately using present, past and future on familiar topics.

o       Interpret short paragraphs on familiar topics.

o       Identify sequence of events in short readings.

o       Examine authentic documents to locate specific information.

o       Produce a paragraph on a familiar topic.

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme. 

Learning Activities: lecture listening, role-plays, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, controlled conversation practice, creative conversation practice, model and repeat, peer review, journals, paragraph modeling, peer review.

Textbooks:  P. Merdinger and L. Barton, NorthStar:  Listening & Speaking Level I and Reading & Writing Level I  (3rd Edition), Longman, 2009 (or comparable). 

501.3 English as a Second Language Level  III

Prerequisite(s):  Placement Test or ESL II.

Course Description:  Prepares students to communicate in familiar job, social or everyday situations in standard American English.   Prerequisite(s):  Placement Test or ESL II.

Course Goals:  To broaden students’ ability to comprehend and respond appropriately to spoken English and to use spoken English in a variety of work and social situations; to broaden students’ ability to comprehend and use grammatical structures in written and spoken English in non-academic setting; to broaden students’ ability to comprehend texts in English; to increase students’ fluency in producing written language.

Course Objectives:  Students will read and listen to a variety of sources with general understanding; express ideas orally and in written form with fluency. 

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to:

o       Recognize main ideas and details in conversations and short lectures. 

o        Communicate needs, activities and events using appropriate time frame and vocabulary.

o       Employ clarification strategies.

o       Apply linguistic, socio-cultural and other background knowledge and strategies to understand the intent of a speaker and to respond appropriately.

o       Speak so others can understand by recalling and using limited vocabulary including words related to common, everyday topics, personal experience, know and use basic grammar and sentence structure and appropriate level of formality.

o       Interpret short paragraphs on familiar topics.

o       Predict meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary with contextual clues.

o       Identify sequence of events in short readings.

o       Examine authentic documents to locate specific information.

o       Convey ideas in a paragraph with detailed information.

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning in a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction is supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units.     

Learning Activities: lecture listening, role-plays, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, controlled conversation practice, creative conversation practice, model and repeat. journals, process writing, peer review.

Textbook:  NorthStar Listening &  Speaking Level II and Reading & Writing Level II (3rd Edition., Pearson Education, (or comparable text).  (formerly 2nd Edition, NorthStar: Basic/Low Intermediate)

501.4 English as a Second Language Level  IV)

Prerequisite(s):  Placement Test or ESL III.

Course Description:  Prepares students to respond to multi-step directions and communicate using formal and informal language in a variety of situations.  Students follow written instructions, read narratives and interpret material.

Course Goals:  To deepen students’ ability to comprehend and respond appropriately to natural, authentic spoken English; to use spoken English in a variety of social, non-academic and professional settings; to deepen students’ ability to comprehend and use grammatical structures in both written and spoken English in various contexts; to deepen students’ ability to comprehend and analyze authentic texts; to deepen students’ ability to organize information and produce summaries.

Course Objectives:  Students will read and listen to a variety of sources; express his/her ideas orally and in written form with fluency and clarity. 

Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will be able to:

o       State detailed descriptions of events, activities and personal experiences.

o        Identify main ideas and some details of extended conversations and broadcasts.

o       Employ clarification strategies.

o       Speak so others can understand to recall and use high-frequency vocabulary, display control of basic grammar and a variety of sentence types.

o       Read with understanding to decode and recognize most everyday and some unfamiliar words.

o       Identify sequence of events in extensive readings.

o       Examine and analyze authentic documents to locate specific information.

o       Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.

o       Convey ideas in a short essay with detailed information.

o       Identify and modify sentences for time frame errors and mechanics, such as spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction will be supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units

Learning Activities: lecture listening, note taking role-plays, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, creative conversation practice, model and repeat, journals, process writing, peer review.

Textbook:  NorthStar:  Listening & Speaking Level III and Reading & Writing Level III 3rd  Edition, (or comparable text).  (formerly2nd Edition, NorthStar: Intermediate).

501.5 English as a Second Language Level V

Prerequisite(s):  Placement Test or ESL IV.

Course Description:  Prepares students to understand sustained conversations and instructions and to communicate independently in various situations.  Students apply reading strategies and thinking skills.  Students write and edit an organized piece of writing.

Course Goals:  To expand students’ ability to comprehend and respond timely and appropriately to natural, authentic spoken English; to use spoken English in a variety of social, non-academic and professional settings; to expand students’ ability to comprehend and use grammatical structures in both written and spoken English in social, non-academic and professional contexts; to expand students’ ability to comprehend, analyze and synthesize authentic texts; to deepen students’ ability to organize information and produce summaries.

Course Objectives:  Students will listen, speak, read and write at a high intermediate level.  Students will communicate effectively and appropriately in standard American English.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will be able to:

o       State detailed descriptions of events, activities and experiences.

o        Identify main ideas and details of extended conversations, lectures and broadcasts.

o       Apply linguistic, socio-cultural and other background knowledge and strategies to understand fully the literal and implied intent of the speaker.

o       Employ clarification strategies.

o       Respond timely and appropriately using present, past and future and modal forms on social, professional and academic topics.

o       Interpret short paragraphs on social, professional and academic topics.

o       Speak so others can understand to recall and use sufficient wide-ranging vocabulary as well as control of basic grammar and a variety of sentence types.

o       Predict meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary with contextual clues.

o       Identify sequence of events in extensive readings and lectures.

o       Examine and analyze authentic documents to locate specific detailed information.

o       Convey ideas in an essay.

o       Identify and modify written work for structural errors and mechanics, such as spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction will be supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units.

Learning Activities: lecture listening, note taking, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, application activities with grammatical structures, creative conversation practice, journals, process writing, peer review, self-review.

Textbook:  NorthStar:  Listening &  Speaking and Reading & Writing Level IV, 3rd Edition, (or comparable text).  (formerly 2nd Edition, NorthStar: High Intermediate)  

501.6 English as a Second Language Level VI

Prerequisite(s):  ESL Placement Test or ESL V.

Course Description:  Prepares students to understand and communicate independently in authentic situations.  Students apply reading strategies and thinking strategies when reading materials from a variety of sources.  Students write and present their ideas with fluency and clarity.

Course Goals:  To enhance students’ ability to comprehend, analyze and respond timely and appropriately to natural, authentic spoken English in a wide variety of settings; to broaden students’ spoken English through the employment of appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation patterns; to enhance students’ ability to comprehend and correctly use grammatical structures in social, non-academic and professional contexts; to expand students’ ability to comprehend, analyze and synthesize authentic texts in a wide variety of settings; to deepen students’ ability to organize information, produce summaries and evaluations; to increase students’ ability to produce written language for a variety of settings.

Course Objectives: Students will listen, speak, read, and write using longer compound and complex sentences and more extensive vocabulary than expected of ESL V students.  They will apply language skills at a higher level to make predictions, express and defend opinions, summarize information, retell a conversation, and compare and contrast.   

Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will be able to:

o       State detailed descriptions of events, activities and experiences with both fluency and clarity.

o        Identify main ideas, and supporting details of extended conversations, lectures and broadcasts.

o       Employ discourse connectors.

o       Use advanced strategies to repair gaps in understanding, to ask questions to deepen comprehension and to give feedback appropriate to the situation.

o       Respond timely and appropriately using a wide variety of grammatical structures and vocabulary.

o       Interpret readings on social, professional and non-academic topics.

o       Predict content in readings.

o       Identify events and activities in extensive readings and lectures.

o       Examine, analyze and synthesize authentic documents to locate specific detailed information.

o       Convey ideas in an organized essay with a clear thesis, supporting ideas and details.

o       Identify and modify written work for organizational and grammatical errors and mechanics, such as spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

Instructional Methods:  An integrated cumulative skills development methodology increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to make meaning from a new language through active learning activities.  Recorded listening passages build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme.  Instruction will be supplemented with ESL audio and video material keyed to textbook units

Learning Activities: lecture listening, note taking, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, application activities with grammatical structures, creative conversation practice, journals, process writing, peer review, self-review.

Textbook:  NorthStar:  Listening & Speaking and Reading & Writing Level V, 3rd Edition, (or comparable text); Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended).   (formerly 2nd Edition, NorthStar: Advanced)

TUITION:  $480 per 120 hours     Certificate:  English as a Second Language Level ___

502 Business English  (120 hours)

Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite:  ESL Placement Test, English 501.5 or equivalent

Course Description:  Business English teaches English language skills designed to help students communicate more successfully in a business and real world environment.  The course emphasizes writing as a process of development that includes drafting, writing, editing, and reading that conveys the writer’s intentions clearly and correctly.   

Course Goals: To broaden students’ ability to communicate clearly and fluently in a professional setting; to broaden students’ spoken English through the employment of appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation patterns; to enhance students’ ability to comprehend and correctly use grammatical structures appropriate in professional contexts; to expand students’ ability to comprehend, analyze and synthesize workplace related texts; to increase students’ ability to produce written documents required in a professional setting.

Course Objectives:  Students will read intensively and write extensively.  Students will develop vocabulary and clear pronunciation needed for a professional business setting.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will be able to:

  • Employ different patterns of development in writing.
  • Recognize how context affects meaning, grammar, and other writing choices.
  • Recognize and correctly use English grammar in context with an emphasis upon grammar and usage issues for ESL writers.
  • Identify and use correct punctuation, mechanics, and spelling in business and real world writing.
  • Identify and restate main ideas, implied meanings and supporting details.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions orally and in written form.

Instructional Methods:  Students develop reading and writing skills from an integrated cumulative skills approach that increases language retention and fluency by stimulating students to create meaning in a new language through active learning activities.  Longer reading passages and recorded listening passages, and videos build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students are guided through the writing process, followed by practice in context activities that allow them to apply each new writing concept to their own writing.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme. 

Learning Activities:  lecture listening, note taking, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, application activities with grammatical structures, creative conversation practice, journals, process writing, peer review, self-review.

Textbooks:  NorthStar: Reading and Writing 4, 3rd Edition., Pearson Education, (or comparable text).  Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended). 

TUITION:  $480   Certificate:  Business English

503 Advanced Reading & Writing (120 hours)

Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite:  Placement Test, English 501.6 (level VI) or equivalent.

Course Description:  Advanced Reading and Writing develops advanced English language skills through close examination of reading passages, through objective discussion of reading, and through paragraph and short essay writing.  The course develops personal, non-academic, and workplace advanced English reading, writing, and oral presentation skills at the multi-paragraph and document level. 

Course Goals: To broaden students’ ability to communicate clearly and fluently in a non-academic or professional setting; to broaden students’ spoken English through the employment of appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation patterns; to enhance students’ ability to comprehend and correctly use grammatical structures appropriate in non-academic and professional contexts; to expand students’ ability to comprehend, analyze and synthesize non-academic and professional texts; to increase students’ ability to produce written documents required in a non-academic and professional setting.

Course Objectives:  Students will read intensively and write extensively to develop rhetorical patterns necessary for successful non-academic study.  Students will give oral presentations that are organized and fluent.

Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will be able to:

  • Employ different patterns of development in writing.
  • Recognize how context affects meaning, grammar, and other writing choices.
  • Recognize and correctly use English grammar in context with an emphasis upon grammar and usage issues for ESL writers.
  • Identify and use correct punctuation, mechanics, and spelling in non-academic and real world writing.
  • Identify and restate main ideas, implied meanings and supporting details.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions both orally and in written form.

Instructional Methods:  Students develop language skills from an integrated cumulative skills approach that increases retention and fluency by stimulating them to create meaning in a new language.  Longer reading passages, recorded listening passages, and videos build on vocabulary and ideas from background material and exercises.  Students are guided through the writing process, followed by practice in context activities to apply each new writing concept to their own writing.  Students work individually, in pairs, and in small groups on guided, linked activities built around each unit's theme. 

Learning Activities: Note taking, pair work, small group work, practice grammatical structures in context, application activities with grammatical structures, creative conversation practice, journals, process writing, peer review, self-review.

Textbooks:  NorthStar 5 Reading and Writing Level 5, 3rd ed., Pearson Education, 2009 (or comparable text); Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended). 

TUITION:  $480    Certificate:  Advanced Reading & Writing

604 English For TASC Preparation (formerly High School Equivalency Diploma Preparation) (240  hours)

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbook:

Mc-Graw Hill Education Preparation for the TASC Test: The Most Authoritative Guide to the New High School Equivalency Exam, by Kathy Zahler, Diane Zahler, Stephanie Muntone and Thomas Evangelist, 2015

Course Description:

In this “English Through TASC” course students develop English language and foundational skills in:

  • Language Arts:  Reading,
  • Language Arts: Writing,
  • Social Studies,
  • Science, and Mathematics

in order to prepare for TASC or GED exam in English.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English skills in:

  • reading
  • writing
  • social studies
  • science
  • math

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read English critically
  • analyze English reading genres
  • compose grammatically correct and concise English writing compositions
  • interpret social studies English readings and illustrations
  • apply critical English reading skills and scientific information to a variety of  science fields
  • solve math word problems in English using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • solve basic algebra and geometry equations in English
  • perform pre and post GED English practice assessments

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • practice of TASC level skills in language arts:  reading (including critical thinking, meaning, organization, and style in various genres);
  • practice of TASC level skills in language arts: writing (including grammar and usage and independent writing components);
  • review and practice of TASC level skills in social studies (including critical reading of various documents and formats requiring higher order thinking skills and interpretation of  illustrations);
  • review and practice of TASC level skills in science (including critical reading and application of scientific information in various fields of science);
  • review and practice of TASC level skills in mathematics (including the four functions and applications with word problems and problem-solving through basic algebra and geometry); and
  • pre-testing and post-testing practice assessments incorporating TASC-style testing formats in English

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Interactive and engaging student-centered activities to review TASC subjects followed by extensive exercises and practice with simulated and actual test material written by TASC test makers that includes feedback on written texts, including essays, as well as, personalized study plans and effective test taking-strategies which are premised on English language learning while having TASC content.  .

TUITION:  $960    Certificate:  TASC Preparation

605 Pre-GED Foundation for GED Preparation (80 hours)

Prerequisite:

Placement test. 

Textbook:

Complete Pre-GED:  A Comprehensive Review of the Skills Necessary for GED Study.  McGraw Hill Contemporary, 2003 or comparable edition. 

Course Description:

This “English Through  Pre-GED” course is designed to provide the English language foundation for GED preparation in the areas of Language Arts: Reading, Language Arts: Writing, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics. 

Course Goals:

This course develops the student’s English language and test-taking skills in:

  • English reading
  • English writing
  • social studies in English
  • science in English and
  • math in English

Objectives:

By the end of the course, students will have received: 

  • review and practice of English language pre-GED level skills in language arts:  reading (including critical thinking, meaning, organization, and style in various genres);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in language arts: writing (including English grammar and usage and independent writing components);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level English language skills in social studies (including critical reading of various documents and formats requiring higher order thinking skills and interpretation of  illustrations);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in science (including critical reading and application of scientific information in English in various fields of science);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in English in mathematics (including the four functions and applications with word problems and problem-solving through basic algebra and geometry); and
  • pre-testing and post-testing practice assessments incorporating GED-style testing formats in English. 

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • practice of pre-GED level skills in language arts:  reading (including critical thinking, meaning, organization, and style in various genres);
  • practice of pre-GED level skills in language arts: writing (including grammar and usage and independent writing components);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in social studies (including critical reading of various documents and formats requiring higher order thinking skills and interpretation of  illustrations);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in science (including critical reading and application of scientific information in various fields of science);
  • review and practice of pre-GED level skills in mathematics (including the four functions and applications with word problems and problem-solving through basic algebra and geometry); and
  • pre-testing and post-testing practice assessments incorporating GED-style testing formats

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classroom review of pre-GED skills followed by extensive exercises and practice with periodic pre- and post-testing and assessment which are premised on English language learning while having pre-GED content.  

TUITION:  $320    Certificate:  Pre-GED Foundation for GED Preparation

610 English For TOEFL Exam Preparation (80 hours)

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Deborah Phillips, Longman Preparation Course For The TOEFL Test:  Next Generation iBT, 2nd ed.  Pearson, 2007 (or comparable text).  Longman Dictionary of American English now with Thesaurus, 3rd or later edition, Pearson, 2004 (recommended). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through TOEFL Prep” course students develop English language skills. The course helps prepare advanced ESL students for the TOEFL through the application of advanced integrated English language skills tested by the Next Generation iBT.

This course is not designed or intended to prepare students for college-level, academic work.

Course Goals:

This course will prepare students’ to take the TOEFL exam

Objectives: 

Students will be able to:

  • apply TOEFL-like English language skills
  • indicate familiarity with Next Generation iBT test-taking strategies
  • recognize TOEFL-like test conditions through practice tests

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • strengthen the application of integrated English language skills in TOEFL-like contexts. 
  • provide understanding of and experience with TOEFL Next Generation iBT test-taking strategies with its emphasis upon integrated English language skills testing. 
  • provide practice test taking under TOEFL-like conditions

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classroom instruction includes timed and untimed practice exercises similar to TOEFL questions and situations.  Students listen to pre-recorded listening material and have supplementary CD ROM material with additional practice exercises and two actual TOEFL iBT tests which are premised on English language learning while having TOEFL iBT content.   

TUITION:   $320   Certificate: TOEFL Examination Preparation

940  English for Introduction to Microsoft Windows  80 Classes

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Suzanne Weixel, Learning Microsoft Windows XP, DDC Publishing, 2002 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through MS Windows” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully understand and complete concepts, features, functions, and applications in Windows.  

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:  skills using Windows functions and features in English

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • interpret textbook readings and directions in English
  • use clear concise English to ask questions
  • explain Windows procedures using clear concise English
  • discuss the basics of Windows operating system
  • navigate Windows toolbar and menus to customize projects

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read about Windows in English and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • read and follow directions in English    when practicing textbook exercises;
  • ask questions concerning concepts and implementation;
  • explain to others procedures used or results obtained;
  • understand the basics of the Windows operating system;
  • understand how to navigate toolbars and use menus to customize Windows; and
  • understand how to use other Windows features.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include theory and development sessions followed by hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output which are premised on English language learning while having Microsoft Windows content.   

TUITION:   $320     Certificate:  Introduction to Using Microsoft Windows

950 English For Using Excel  (80 hours)

PREREQUISITE: 

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbook:

Steve Schwartz, Microsoft Office 2008 (Part III, Chapters 9 to 16), Prachtree Press, 2008 (or comparable text). 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In this “English Through Excel” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully execute operations in Excel.  This course introduces students to English language spreadsheet concepts, features, functions, and applications using Excel.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:  English skills to navigate Excel in English

OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

  • analyze and demonstrate use of Excel spreadsheets in English
  • identify uses of  Excel in everyday situations in English
  • use Excel toolbars and menus to customize projects
  • apply other Excel features

Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • use English spreadsheets, in general, and Excel, in particular;
  • understand in English how Excel can be applied to real world situations;
  • navigate English toolbars and use English  menus to customize Excel; and
  • use other Excel features in English.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having Excel content.    Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

TUITION:   $320     Certificate:  Using Excel for Windows

955 English For Using the Internet (80 hours)

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Don Mayo and Catherine Skintik, Learning the Internet:  Fundamentals, Projects, and Exercises, DDC Publishing, (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Using The Internet” course students develop English language skills needed to be successful with the structure of the Internet.  The course provides English direction and practice in using the Internet correctly to obtain valid information for personal, for business, and for academic use.   The course emphasizes good searching skills and includes practice in developing a personal English web page.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills. Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ ability to:

  • read and interpret internet basics through written English
  • read and interpret textbook exercises in written English
  • verbally explain internet procedures in English
  • distinguish between valid and invalid internet information
  • create a personal web page

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read and interpret internet basics through written English
  • read and interpret textbook exercises in written English
  • verbally explain internet procedures in English
  • distinguish between valid and invalid internet information
  • create a personal web page
  • demonstrate use of  the World Wide Web and its features.

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read about Internet basics and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • ask English questions concerning concepts and implementation;
  • explain procedures used or results obtained;
  • understand in English the basics of Internet searching that produces valid information for personal, for business, and for academic use;
  • understand how to create a personal web page; and
  • understand in English how to use other World Wide Web features.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include development and theory  sessions followed by hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all kills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having Using the Internet content.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

TUITION:  $320      Certificate: Using the Internet

965 English For Using Microsoft PowerPoint (80 hours)

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Lisa A. Buck, Learning Adobe Photoshop CS2, DDC Publishing, (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through PhotoShop” course students develop English language skills needed to be successful with PhotoShop. Students will learn how to work with PhotoShop images from a variety of real world situations and sources.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English knowledge and skills by using PhotoShop.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Read and interpret written PhotoShop directions for textbook exercises in English
  • Express questions clearly and concisely regarding PhotoShop
  • Explain PhotoShop procedures using clear concise English
  • Discuss the basics of the PhotoShop program
  • Use the basics of PhotoShop from a variety of real world situations and sources to design, develop and customize images

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read about PhotoShop basics and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • Read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • Ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • Explain procedures used or results obtained regarding the basics of PhotoShop;
  • Write simple explanations of procedures used or results obtained
  • Use PhotoShop applications to design, develop, and customize images;
  • Employ the basics of creating PhotoShop images from sources;
  • Apply PhotoShop to real world situations;
  • Use navigation toolbars and menus to customize PhotoShop; and
  • Use other PowerPoint features.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having PhotoShop content.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

TUITION:   $320     Certificate: Using Microsoft PowerPoint

975 English For Using Adobe PhotoShop (160 hours)

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

Lisa A. Buck, Learning Adobe Photoshop CS2, DDC Publishing, (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through PhotoShop” course students develop English language skills needed to be successful with PhotoShop. Students will learn how to work with PhotoShop images from a variety of real world situations and sources.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English knowledge and skills by using PhotoShop.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Read and interpret written PhotoShop directions for textbook exercises in English
  • Express questions clearly and concisely regarding PhotoShop
  • Explain PhotoShop procedures using clear concise English
  • Discuss the basics of the PhotoShop program
  • Use the basics of PhotoShop from a variety of real world situations and sources to design, develop and customize images

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read about PhotoShop basics and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • Read and follow directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • Ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • Explain procedures used or results obtained regarding the basics of PhotoShop;
  • Write simple explanations of procedures used or results obtained
  • Use PhotoShop applications to design, develop, and customize images;
  • Employ the basics of creating PhotoShop images from sources;
  • Apply PhotoShop to real world situations;
  • Use navigation toolbars and menus to customize PhotoShop; and
  • Use other PowerPoint features.

Instructional Methods:

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having PhotoShop content.  Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

TUITION: $640   Certificate: Using Adobe Photoshop

990 English For  Introduction to the MAC  (80 hours)

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

The Little MAC Book:  Snow Leopard Edition by Robin Williams, Peachpit Press, 2010 (or comparable text). 

Other Instructional Material:

Apple’s on-line tutorials at:  http://www.apple.com/support/mac101/

Course Description:

In this “English Through Introduction To MAC” course students develop English language skills to be successful with the Mac OSX operating system and Mac computers.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will explain features and basic usage of the MAC operating system in English

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • interpret English readings and verbal explanations regarding Macintosh computers
  • use the Apple support site to locate answers to specific questions
  • create questions in English about concepts or procedures
  • explain procedures and results
  • identify the basics of Macintosh’s OS X v 10.6 Snow Leopard operating system
  • navigate Mac toolbars and menus
  • use Mac features

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read in English about Macintosh computers and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • use the Apple Macintosh English support site to use Mac computers effectively and efficiently and to answer specific questions;
  • read and follow directions in English when practicing exercises;
  • ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • explain to others procedures used or results obtained;
  • understand the basics of Macintosh’s OS X v10.6 Snow Leopard operating system in English;
  • to understand how to navigate English toolbars and use English menus to customize the Mac; and
  • to understand how to use other Mac features in English.

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having introduction to MAC content.   Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

TUITION:  $320         Certificate:  Introduction to the MAC

995 English For Switching to the Mac  80 hours

Prerequisite(s):

Any Microsoft Office application course.

Textbooks:

The Little MAC Book:  Snow Leopard Edition by Robin Williams, Peachpit Press, 2010 (or comparable text). 

Course Description:

In this “English Through Switching To MAC” course students develop English language skills needed to successfully transition from a Windows PC to a Mac OS environment.

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’ English skills in using Mac functions and features.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Read and interpret Mac basics through written English
  • Read and interpret textbook exercises in written English
  • Use clear concise English to ask questions
  • Explain Mac procedures using clear concise English
  • Discuss the basics of Mac program in English

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Read in English about Mac and understand what is being discussed or described;
  • Read and interpret in English Mac support site to use Mac computers effectively and efficiently;
  • Follow directions in English when practicing textbook exercises;
  • Ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • Explain to others in English procedures used or results obtained;
  • Understand the basics of Mac operating system described in English;
  • Use English navigation toolbars and menus to customize the Mac;
  • Use other Mac features in English

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having switching to MAC content.   Each student will create a portfolio of finished output.

TUITION:  $320         Certificate:  Switching to the MAC

1000  English For Using Apple iMovie   80 hours

Prerequisite(s):

English Level 5 or by individual placement through advisement

Textbooks:

iMovie & iDVD:  The Missing Manual, David Pogue and Aaron Miller, O’Reilly Media/Pogue Press:  2009 (or recent edition). 

Other Instructional Aids:

Apple’s on-line tutorials, iMovie and iDVD, www.apple,com/ilife/imovie,  www.apple,com/ilife/iphoto, www.apple,com/ilife/idvd

Course Description:

In this “English Through iMovie” course students develop English language skills to be successful with Apple iMovie.  Students will learn how to create movies on the computer using a variety of media and to output their movies to tape or disk, send them via e-mail, or post them to a web site. 

This course is not intended to provide instruction which will result in the student's acquisition of occupational skills.  Placement assistance by the school is not available for this course.

Course Goals:

This course will develop students’:  knowledge and usage of iMovie

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • read and interpret English written iMovie directions for textbook exercises
  • interpret documents and situations written in English to design, develop, and customize iMovie applications for various situations
  • express question in English regarding iMovie
  • write simple iMovie procedures and results in English
  • explain the design and content of iMovie and iDVD
  • use the basics of gathering video assets, trimming and organizing them, garnishing them with title tracks, special effects, and transitions.
  • modify and use iMovie to create stand-alone movies; and output their created videos to tape or disk, e-mail, or the Web.

Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • read in English about video editing software and iMovie and understand what is being discussed or described IN English;
  • read and follow English directions when practicing textbook exercises;
  • read English documents and descriptions of situations and decide in English how to use iMovie applications to design, develop, and customize video compositions;
  • ask questions in English concerning concepts and implementation;
  • write simple English explanations of procedures used or results obtained;
  • explain in English the design and content of iMovie and iDVD presentations; and
  • understand the basics of gathering video assets; of trimming and organizing them; of garnishing them with title tracks, special effects, and transitions; of using iMovie to create stand-alone English movies; and of outputting their created videos to tape or disk, e-mail, or the Web.

Instructional Methods: 

A content-based approach is employed to provide a more natural way to motivate English language learning which accelerates language acquisition when students see a real-world purpose in learning something they are interested in rather than language in isolation.  Classes include hands-on practice and drills.  Students will complete periodic summary exercises that require application of all skills learned to date which are premised on English language learning while having iMovie content.  Each student will create, develop, and output a video production and share it with other students, according to guidelines provided by the instructor.   

TUITION:  $320         Certificate:  Using Apple iMovie

Admissions Requirements

The Institute welcomes applications from individuals seriously interested in acquiring improved English Language skills.  Applicants are accepted without regard to race, color, national origin, creed, sex, or physical handicaps.

Applicants for admission must be beyond the age of compulsory schooling.

Applicants for admission to individual courses need not be high school graduates.

The Institute does not engage the services of outside recruiters or agents.  All students or their family or a friend must contact the Institute directly in order to receive firsthand orientation on important policies and procedures.  No person or persons have been authorized to represent the Institute off site.

Admissions Procedures

Applicants may complete the Institute's "Application For Admission" and return it to the school or avail themselves of the Institute's "one-step, on-the-spot" Admissions process.  In the case of the "one-step, on-the-spot" Admissions process, the student provides all needed eligibility information in person to a Faculty Student-Services Associate immediately prior to enrollment.

An interview is conducted.  The purpose of the interview is to explore the applicant's goals and abilities as they relate to the Institute's courses.

Arrangements will be jointly made by the applicant and the Institute to forward to the Institute the applicant's official high school transcript of grades.  The Institute provides a release form for this purpose.  For high school graduates or those with high school equivalency, the institution shall have on file evidence that the student has received a high school diploma or its equivalent. A signed statement by the student is acceptable documentation.

Upon acceptance the applicant and Institute complete an "Enrollment Agreement."  The Agreement specifies all costs, payment methods, and courses of instruction.

Although a personal interview is required of all applicants, out-of-town or foreign students who register by mail and meet other requirements may schedule the interview upon their arrival in New York.  All interviews must be completed prior to the start of classes.

Advanced Standing

Required courses may be waived for students who can demonstrate proficiency in the competencies taught in those courses, based on OBJECTIVE performance criteria.  Documentation of how students demonstrate proficiency in competencies is maintained in the student's file.

A student given advanced standing must complete the total approved hours for the program unless an amended enrollment agreement is signed for the remaining hours.

Advanced standing does not imply "transfer hours" which are defined below.

Transfer Of Hours

Students who request transfer of hours are required to present transcripts of previous studies for evaluation.  A transfer of hours may be granted for hours completed in an approved course or program from a licensed or registered school or a registered program at a degree granting institution or in recognized post-secondary institutions, at the discretion of the President or his designee, after an evaluation of the student's transcript.

A student given transfer of hours has only to complete the number of approved instructional hours for the program minus the number of transfer hours granted by the Institute.

The President or his designee reserves the right to test students before a final determination is made.  Tuition adjustments will be made as required.

Limits of Study for B-2 Nonimmigrants

The following guidance is provided in a Department of Justice memorandum:

"The prohibition against beginning a course of study prior to obtaining Service approval of a change of nonimmigrant status request is limited to B-1 or B-2 nonimmigrants. The term ."course of study;' implies a focused program of classes, such as a full-time course load leading to a degree or, in the case of a vocational student, some type of certification.  Casual, short-term classes that are not the primary purpose of the alien's presence in the United States, such as a single English language or crafts class, would not constitute a "course of study."  Courses with more substance or that teach a potential vocation, such as flight training, would be considered part of a "course of study" and thus would require approval of a student status; . . . "

Student Visa Applications  (Form / I-20)

The Institute is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant foreign students.  A foreign student may register by mail, email, online or through a relative or friend in the United States.  Please provide the following:

·         a copy of the passport page (or national identity document) which shows student's full name, birth date, country of birth and citizenship

·         address in the United States

·         permanent address abroad

·         duration of initial session course of study desired

·         information showing the student's means of support for an academic term.

·         payment of the required tuition deposit.
(This amount is deducted from the total tuition for the course selected.)

·         certificate or transcript from the last school attended.  Transcripts and certificates are not returned.

The Institute will complete the Form I-20 (Certificate of Eligibility) and send it to the student for presentation to the proper consular officials.  Upon providing this information, the student will receive a copy of the Enrollment Agreement for his/her signature.  A copy of the Enrollment Agreement is retained by the Institute.

Financial Assistance

Pay-As-You-Learn Plan.  The Institute seeks to make its courses of study affordable to the greatest number of students.  In certain circumstances, a Tuition Payment Plan makes it possible for students to "pay as they attend" without interest charges.

Average Cost of Attendance.  The following represents the average cost for a student to attend the Institute for one academic year.

EXPENSE ITEMS

Commuting from parents home No dependents

All others

Tuition & Fees

$5,450

$5,450

Books & Supplies

600

600

Room & Board

1,500

4,331

Personal Expenses

1,625

2,444

Transportation

546

546

TOTAL

$9,721

$13,371

Waiver Criteria

Students may be granted a waiver of "good academic standing" standards. The waiver is not automatic.  The waiver is granted only by the President or his designee under the following conditions, if it is determined that there is a reasonable expectation that the student will meet future requirements, if said waiver is in the student's best interest, and if:

·         the waiver is discussed with the student and signed agreement obtained;  

·         the reason for student's failure to meet requirements is assessed & evaluated;

·         a complete written record of waiver, evaluation findings, and determination becomes a part of the student's record; and

·         only one waiver may be granted to a student.

Refund Policy

The Institute adheres to the refund policy on the Enrollment Agreement given to students at registration.  It reads as follows:

I. AFTER SIGNING THIS AGREEMENT BUT BEFORE STARTING CLASS THE SCHOOL KEEPS: the non-refundable registration fee.  THE LESSER OF 10% of tuition or ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($100) per course or program.  (Registration fee is additional to tuition but is deducted from last payment.)

II.  AFTER STARTING CLASSES THE SCHOOL KEEPS:

A. The non-refundable registration fee (THE LESSES of 10% of tuition PER COURSE or Program) or ONE HUNDRED DOLLAR ($100) registration fee per course or program PLUS
the stated cost of such textbooks, tools, materials, supplies, etc. as have been issued by the school and accepted by the student, PLUS: The school keeps tuition

1. FOR QUARTER ENROLLMENTS (all courses): If termination occurs week #

 

1st Quarter of 1st Enrollment

Quarter 1 or 2 * of subsequent enrollments

 

subsequent Quarters

week 1

  0%

0%

25%

week 2

 20%

25%

50%

week 3

 30%

50%

75%

week 4

 40%

75%

100%

week 5

 50%

100%

100%

week 6

 50%

100%

100%

week 7

 60%

100%

100%

week 8

100%

100%

100%

2. FOR First-Time Students in TERM ENROLLMENTS (all programs), The school keeps:

For withdrawal in:

Term 1

2nd Term

Subsequent Terms *

Week  #1

0% of the term tuition

*

20% of the term tuition

Week  #2

20% of the term tuition

*

35% of the term tuition

Week  #3

20% of the term tuition

*

50% of the term tuition

Week  #4

30% of the term tuition

*

70% of the term tuition

Week  #5

40% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #6

40% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #7

50% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #8

50% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #9

60% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week #10

100% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

3. FOR Non-First Time TERM ENROLLMENTS students (all programs), The school keeps:

For withdrawal in

Term 1

2nd Term

Subsequent Terms *

Week  #1

0% of the term tuition

*

20% of the term tuition

Week  #2

20% of the term tuition

*

35% of the term tuition

Week  #3

35% of the term tuition

*

50% of the term tuition

Week  #4

50% of the term tuition

*

70% of the term tuition

Week  #5

70% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

Week  #6

100% of the term tuition

*

100% of the term tuition

* If the student withdraws in the second term, the school must use the first term schedule unless the school demonstrates that no significant educational change occurred in the program as of the student's last date of attendance.  Significant Educational Change is defined as non-functioning equipment which adversely affects the student's program, material change in the student's schedule as agreed to at enrollment, substitution of teacher in a course after instruction begins if the teacher does not possess necessary language skills in approved language of instruction in order to effectively communicate subject matter to students, or significant increase in student-teacher ratio.

4. FOR ENROLLMENTS OF MORE THAN TWELVE MONTHS:
A student who cancels during the first twelve months is refunded all monies in advance for the second twelve months or part thereof.

B. ALL REFUNDS ARE MADE WITHIN FORTY-FIVE (45) DAYS.  Although not required, written notice of cancellation is recommended.  Refunds are computed as of the last date of recorded attendance.  The failure of a student to immediately notify the school director in writing of the student’s intent to withdraw may delay a refund of tuition to the student pursuant to Section 5002(3) of the Education Law.

C. Diplomas, Certificates of Completion, and academic transcripts are not issued until the student meets all requirements and monetary obligations.

D. Students dismissed for improper conduct, poor attendance, failing progress, or tuition arrears are not relieved of financial obligations as specified in this Enrollment Agreement.

Enrollment Agreement

Each student who registers at the Institute is given an enrollment agreement which indicates:  course of study, course length, tuition rate per class, total tuition required, payment plan (first payment and weekly payment), starting and ending dates of the course, and the refund policy. This enrollment agreement is signed by authorized personnel of the Institute and by the student.  One copy is made a permanent part of the student's file.  No promises other than those so specified in this agreement are binding.

Tuition

The tuition and fees are specified on the supplement enclosed with this catalog.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                VI.      ACADEMIC POLICIES

Office Hours

The Institute's offices at 240 West 35 Street, Manhattan, Second Floor, are open for information, registration, and conferences from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday inclusive, except on school holidays.

Student Program Card

Each student receives a program card on the first day of classes.  The program card indicates hours, subjects, and room assignments.  It must be presented to each teacher for admission to class.  Students should retain the program card at all times.

Program Changes

Each student's program is the result of consultation at the time of registration.  Program changes can be made only after further discussion with administrative personnel and a complete understanding of the reason for the requested change and the effect the change will have on the student's scholastic goals.

Attendance And Tardiness

Regular attendance is required for all classes.  Daily attendance is taken in all classes and all absence and tardiness is reported to the office.  No credit for attendance will be given for a class session in which a "class cut" occurs.

Absences.  When a student must be absent from classes, the student must:

·         telephone the office at (212) 840‑7111 to report the reason for absence and

·         provide the Institute with a written explanation for the absence upon returning to classes.

Tardiness.  Promptness in school is important preparation for the business world.  Students must report to classes on time.  Three class late arrivals s of more than five minutes are charged as one absence.  Faculty members may exclude students chronically arriving more that fifteen minutes late without good cause, should this condition result in disruption to the other students or the teacher.

Students arriving more that thirty minutes late do not receive credit for the class hour.

Notification of Absence.  When a student is absent more than five times in a calendar month, a notice is sent to the student's email or home directing him/her to meet with school personnel and advising of possible loss of certificate/diploma eligibility or loss of student visa status.

A student who is absent for more than 15% of the total course time and who has not maintained satisfactory grades or academic progress will be dismissed.  Students dismissed for any reason are not relieved of the monetary obligations stated in the Enrollment Agreement.

F-1 Student Visa SEVIS Record

The Institute's designated school official must terminate the SEVIS (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System) record of any F-1 student visa student who does not comply with the SEVP (Student and Exchange Visitor Program) full course of study requirement or where a pattern of non-attendance is evident.

Textbooks And Materials

Students may not attend classes without the required textbooks and materials.  Credit is not extended for the purchase of textbooks or materials in the Institute's Bookstore.  Students are not required to buy their books through the school bookstore.  They are encouraged to seek low-cost online alternatives for new or used books and to use the Student Club "Book Exchange" to contact other students wishing to buy or sell their unwanted used textbooks.

"Fair Use" Duplication of Copyrighted Classroom Material Guidelines

The Spanish-American Institute requires faculty to observe the legal restrictions on duplication of copyrighted material in the United States Copyright Law.  The duplication of multiple copies of print and graphic material for classroom use is restricted by the Law's "fair use" guidelines. 

While the Law does not provide an exact measure of the amount of copyrighted material that a faculty member may duplicate without first seeking permission from or making payment to the author or publisher of the copyrighted material, it does provide guidelines restricting the nature and amount of material that may be duplicated and the amount that may be duplicated in any time period. 

The Spanish-American Institute strives to provide teachers and students with comprehensive copyrighted required textbook and workbook materials for all courses.  Faculty are encouraged to maximize the use of school textbooks and workbooks in their classes and to use additional material only when absolutely necessary.  In those instances, the Spanish-American Institute has adopted the following "fair use" requirements for multi-copying of copyrighted material, consistent with standards used at many other postsecondary institutions. 

Faculty members are required to observe the following school copyright policy, whether the material for classroom use is being duplicated by the Spanish-American Institute or by a source outside the school: 

1.       "Consumable works" such as workbook material may never be copied for classroom use.

2.       The same item shall not be duplicated over and over again.

3.       No more than 10% or 1,000 words, whichever is less, of a longer prose work may be duplicated for classroom use.

4.       For all other material, consult with the Dean of Academic Affairs before duplicating multiple copies.  

Homework

Homework is assigned regularly and is an important part of the learning process.  All students are expected to complete assignments to the best of their ability and to present them in class on the due day.

Make-Up Assignments / Tests / Academic Dismissal

Students must satisfactorily complete an equal amount of make-up work for the time they are absent.  Students who require more than eight days beyond the scheduled course completion date may be charged at the hourly rate for the additional time.  A student who misses 15% of the total course time and who has not maintained satisfactory grades or academic progress will be dismissed.

Make-up Examinations.  When a student does not take an examination for valid reasons, a make-up examination is required within ten days of the student's return to classes.  The instructor schedules such make-up examinations.

Incomplete Status.  A student who has received an "INC" for whatever reason must rectify this deficiency within ten days or receive a failing grade for the subject in which an incomplete was given.

Dress Code

The Institute does not have a uniform or standard dress requirement.  Students may dress in casual, comfortable attire; they are expected to be neat and presentable at all times.  Their manner and dress should reflect credit on themselves and on the Institute.

Leave of Absence

A student who requires a leave of absence must submit the request in writing to the office.  If the leave is granted, the student will be permitted to suspend his/her course of study for a period not to exceed three months.  The student may then resume without loss of time or tuition paid.

When a student returns from an approved leave of absence, the student shall be placed in the instructional program at the point commensurate with the skill level retained by the student at the time of his or her return.  For leaves of less than 30 calendar days, there will be a counseling session to determine the student’s retention level.  For leaves in excess of thirty days, in addition to the counseling session, faculty members will assess the student’s retention level and provide instruction accordingly.

Grading Scale

Student grades are assigned as follows:

Table 1 Grading Scale

LETTER GRADE

POINTS

GRADE RANGE

MEANING

A

4.0

90-100%

honors

  B+

3.5

85-89%

excellent

B

3.0

80-84%

above average

  C+

2.5

75-79%

average

C

2.0

70-74%

satisfactory

D

1.5

65-69%

passing

F

0.

60-64%

failing

W

-

 

withdrawal

I

0.

 

incomplete

N

-

 

new student

  Ab

0

 

Exam Absence

Maintaining Satisfactory Progress

Academic Progress.  In order to maintain good academic standing, a student must achieve a grade of at least 65% and attain a cumulative average of not less than 70% (Grade Point Average: 2.0).  There are six grade reporting periods in each calendar year.   The Institute assesses satisfactory progress for students at the:

·         end of each student's academic year,

·         quarter point of the regular time frame,

·         halfway point of the regular time frame,

·         quarter point of the established maximum time frame of the program,

·         halfway point of the established maximum time frame of the program, and

·         three-quarter point of the established maximum time frame of the program.

Students not maintaining satisfactory academic progress at the regular halfway point will be placed on probation until the halfway point of the maximum time frame.

The maximum time frame in which a student must complete his/her educational objective is 1.5 times the standard program length for normally progressing students of the same enrollment status.  At the halfway point of the maximum time frame of a program, the student must have successfully completed at least 60% of the clock hours attempted toward the educational objective.  The minimum grade-point average at the halfway point of the maximum length must be 1.5. 

At the 75% point of the maximum permitted length, the student must have completed 65% of the clock hours attempted toward the educational objective and the grade point average must be 1.75. 

A student on academic probation is considered to be making satisfactory progress during the probationary period.    At graduation the minimum grade point average must be 2.0.  Evaluations are conducted at least once every academic year at the 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% point of the maximum program length.  Please see Table 2 Satisfactory Progress on page 52 below.

Incomplete Status.  A student who has received an "INC" (incomplete) for whatever reason must rectify his/her deficiency within ten (10) days or be considered failing in his/her grade for the course in which an incomplete "INC" was given.

·         Withdrawals.  A student who withdraws from a course prior to completing the course requirements earns a grade of "W" and zero points for that course.  A student who withdraws from or repeats a course for whatever reason, must complete the program with the required number of courses within the time frame allowed.  A failing grade will not be included in the student’s grade point average if the student repeats and passes the course.  Only the passing grade will be calculated in the average. 

Repeated Courses Grades.  Grades earned for courses repeated due to failure to obtain a passing grade replace the failing grade in computations of satisfactory academic progress except with respect to the computation of the maximum time frame permitted to complete the program.

Pass/Fail Grades. The Institute does not use pass/fail grades.  See Grading Scale on page 49 for a explanation of the Institute's grading scale.

Non-Credit, Remedial Coursework.   Non-credit remedial classes are not available.  Students requiring extra help or tutoring should contact the Dean of Students for assistance.  Hours beyond the normal program elective and required hours and are not included in the computation of satisfactory academic progress.

Extended Enrollment Status.  A student determined to not be making satisfactory progress at the evaluation points described above may be continued in extended enrollment status at the discretion of the Dean of Students for an unlimited period of time, provided that the student and Dean discuss and agree in writing to the following:

·         the student is responsible for all financial arrangements with the school;

·         the school may charge the student for tuition and fees during extended enrollment, but is not required to do so.

While in extended enrollment status,

·         students must seek to correct any academic deficiencies by taking additional course hours, retaking courses they have failed and upgrading their skills;

·         students who exceed one and half times the normal course length in extended enrollment status do not receive the original academic credential for which they enrolled but may receive a certificate of completion; and

·         the Institute will calculate refunds from the last day of attendance, not including extended enrollment.

Re-establishing Satisfactory Academic Progress.  A student may reestablish satisfactory progress after failing to maintain the minimum standards if:

1)      the student successfully retakes previously failed courses or upgrades the skills applicable to the student's educational objective so that the recalculated GPA and successful completion percentage meet or exceed the minimum requirements;

2)      the student is evaluated by interview with the Dean of Students or his designee to determine that the student has the desire and academic ability to progress satisfactorily in the program; and

3)      after reestablishing satisfactory progress, the student is placed on academic probation until the next evaluation point. 

 Effect on Satisfactory Academic Progress for Transfer Hours

Only student's Spanish-American Institute course work average is assessed.  Transfer course grades do not impact the student's Institute GPA.  Transfer courses accepted by the Institute count as attempted and earned courses for the quantitative measure.  That is to say, courses completed at another school and accepted by the Institute are excluded from the GPA calculation, but included in the completion rate and maximum time frame calculations.

Effect on Satisfactory Academic Progress of Program Changes

A student who is in compliance with the Institute's Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy may change their program of study.  The maximum timeframe will include all courses the student has attempted including those not applicable to the new program.  A student who changes programs will have included in the determination of his or her satisfactory academic progress standing (both quantitatively and qualitatively) the course or courses attempted and grade(s) earned that count toward the student's new program of study.

 Effect on Satisfactory Academic Progress of Additional Credential

A student who seeks to earn an additional credential must complete the required courses for each of the programs within the timeframe of the longer program.  In addition the student must meet all quantitative and qualitative standards for each of the programs.

Grade Reporting Procedures

Students are tested regularly and must achieve a satisfactory grade in order to maintain good standing.  Examinations are given bi-monthly to measure student progress.  All grades are entered on official grade sheets by the teacher and submitted to the office for entry into individual student records.  A Progress Report (report card letters) is e-mailed (or individually printer upon request) to each student after each bi-monthly examination period.  Final grades for each course in a program are calculated by taking a straight average of each of the weekly grades recorded by instructors on the weekly attendance rosters.  Course final grades are weighted by course hours when calculating grade point averages for programs.

Academic Warning and Probation

Students who receive a cumulative average below 70% (Grade Point Average of 2.0) for two consecutive bi-monthly grading periods will be placed on academic warning for the next two bi-monthly grading periods and are expected to improve their grades in the next examination periods.  Such students will be extended guidance, extra classes, and homework in an effort to improve upon their performance. 

Assessment Procedures Used To Determine ESL Placement

After enrolling in the ESL-Plus Course of Study and before starting classes, student are individually scheduled for ESL level placement by completion of an internationally recognized and normed placement test to determine their current abilities.  The CELSA Test (Combined English Language Skills Assessment) is a 45-minute test consisting of 75 questions.  It is designed to place ESL (English as a Second Language) students in the appropriate ESL classes.

Assessment Procedures To Determine ESL Level-To-Level Progression

Students begin studies at the level corresponding to their current language abilities as determined by a placement test and remain in the assigned level for the number of hours indicated unless the instructor recommends a higher level sooner or later.  Teacher recommendations are based on student attainment of the course terminal objectives in less than (or more than) the normal number of hours.  Students may complete less than (or more  than) course hours of work in listed individual course hours if teachers recommend advancement upon completion of terminal objectives prior to (or after) completion of the individual course hours.  Slower students must complete 65% of the course hour terminal objectives to maintain satisfactory academic progress.  Therefore, the number of hours spent in each course will vary according to course placement at registration and individual achievement of terminal course objectives.

Assessment Procedures To Determine Completion Of ESL-Plus

To meet the Institute’s ESL-Plus Course of Study completion requirements, the student must:

1.       pass all courses in the Course of Study with a grade of 65% or higher,

2.       have a cumulative average of at least 70% (Grade Point Average: 2.0),

3.       have met all financial obligations to the Institute. 

Students are tested regularly and must achieve a satisfactory grade in order to maintain good standing.  Examinations are given bi-monthly to measure student progress.  Bi-monthly exams are keyed to student learning outcomes in each course syllabi.  All grades are entered on official grade sheets by the teacher and submitted to the office for entry into individual permanent student records.  A Progress Report (report card letter) is e-mailed (or individually printed upon request) to each student after each bi-monthly examination period.  Final grades for each course in the ESL-Plus Course of Study are calculated by taking a straight average of each of the bi-monthly grades recorded by instructors on the bi-monthly attendance/grade rosters.  Course final grades are weighted by course hours when calculating grade point averages for course of study.  Alternately students may demonstrate mastery of terminal course objectives at any time by scoring 80% or higher on the corresponding MyLab Exit Test.

Bi-Monthly Individual Reports of Results

Students are informed of their individual progress by a Progress Report (report card letter) that is e-mailed (or individually printed upon request) to each student after each bi-monthly examination period. 

Appeal Procedures

Academic Warning / Probation Appeal Procedure

Students may provide information about mitigating or special circumstances relating to academic probation within three weeks of being placed on academic probation.  The Academic Warning and Probation Appeals Committee consisting of the Institute’s President and Deans will evaluate this information.  A determination will be made within ten (10) days of receipt of the student’s written appeal request.

Grade Appeals Procedures

Students may provide information about mitigating or special circumstances relating to grades within three weeks of receiving the grade.  Grade Appeals Committee consisting of the Institute’s President or his designated representative  Dean, Chair or senior faculty member will evaluate this information.  A determination will be made within ten (10) days of receipt of the student’s written appeal request.

Program Evaluation Points

Evaluations are conducted at least once every academic year and at the 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% point of the maximum program length. 

Table 2 Satisfactory Progress

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS TABLE

Required Evaluation Point

Minimum GPA

Minimum % Successful Completion of Courses Attempted

**

25% of maximum program length

1.25

55%

*

 50% of maximum program length

1.50

60%

*

 75% of maximum program length

1.75

65%

*

100% of maximum program length

2.00

N/A

 

 

 

 

**

End of First Academic Year

1.25

55%

*

End of Second Academic Year

2.00

60%

*

Students not meeting standards will be dismissed; probation is not allowed at this point

**

Students not meeting these standards are considered for probation

This table should be used together with the minimum successful completion standards, starting with item Maintaining Satisfactory Progress on page 49.

Table 3  Maximum Program Length Table

MAXIMUM PROGRAM LENGTH TABLE

Normal Program Length

Maximum Program Length

25% of Maximum Program Length

50% of Maximum Program Length

75% of Maximum Program Length

720 hours

1080 hours

270 hours

540 hours

810 hours

960 hours

1440 hours

360 hours

720 hours

1080 hours

1600 hours

2400 hours

600 hours

1200 hours

1800 hours

1920 hours

2880 hours

720 hours

1440 hours

2160 hours

Course Certificates of Completion

To meet the Institute's graduation requirements for a Certificate of Completion in a course, the student must:

·         have a minimum passing grade of 65% for the course,

·         meet the skills requirement of the course, and

·         have met all financial obligations to the Institute.

Academic Year

Since the Institute employs the continuous enrollment method, there are no specific "registration dates."  New students are admitted to classes on the second Monday of each month.  There are, therefore, 12 start dates a year.  All course of study are designed so that students are able to progress systematically through each lesson.  Students are tested regularly.  Students must pass required tests in order to maintain good academic standing.

Academic Calendar

The Institute is open year-round except for the following holidays.  The holidays listed below correspond to those observed by New York State and Federal offices.  The Institute is also closed for the period between Christmas Eve and New Year's Day.

      Martin Luther King Day

      Labor Day

      Presidents' Day

      Columbus Day

      Good Friday

      Veteran's Day

      Memorial Day

      Thanksgiving (2 days)

      Independence Day

      Year End Vacation Week

Class Hour Schedule

9:15 a.m.

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